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Brilliant Purple Long Bean, Vigna unguiculata sesquipedalis

Splendid Long Beans grown by Green Team Farm in Salt Lake City, Utah.

That title is just a bunch of names for a lot of fun! Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis, is a subspecies of the cowpea, grown around the world. It is a pleasure to grow, every inch of the way!

Long beans have a distinct flavor all their own you may need to get used to. Since they are a heat loving bean, I wait to plant mine in June after my other beans are producing. The long beans come in later when the other beans are finishing and long beans don’t mind the last of summer heat. Just when I’m getting tired of the regular beans, there come my Long beans, tweaking my palate!

If you have a good hot summer, they grow that impossible 16 to 20″ fast and prolifically, great production per square foot! Grow them in full sun and overnight, you will get oodles of Noodles! Depending on your soil and how many you plant, you can harvest handfuls almost daily! You will be giving them away to people with an adventurous palate to delighted oohs and ahhs! Don’t neglect daily harvest when they are at peak season, or your plant will think it is done and stop producing.

Luscious Varieties!

Long beans are grown everywhere and there are a lot of kinds of them! They are grown extensively in Asia and India. Per ‘KnowYourVegetables’ Long beans are a traditional food plant in Africa, this little-known vegetable has potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable land-care.

They come in pink and yellow. Green, red, purple, or all these three colors in one bean in the variety Mosaic! Mosaic seed can be purchased from Kitazawa Seed Company of Oakland CA.

The Spruce recommends these varieties for various reasons!

  • Liana: A day-neutral variety that starts producing early in the season. It is also recommended as a fall crop in warm climates. (70 days)
  • Purple podded: Good for hot seasons. Retains most of its color when stir-fried. (90 days)
  • Red noodle: Similar to purple podded, but more flavorful with a crunchier texture. (95 days)
  • Stickless wonder: An unusual dwarf variety [that means it can be a container variety!]. The vines only grow to about 30 inches tall and do not need trellising. Plants start flowering early (40 days) but, like many bush beans, they don’t have as long a season as taller vining varieties. (54 days)
  • Yard long (white seeded, black seeded, red seeded, extra long): Often you will only find seed packets labeled as Yard Long Beans, but there are subtle differences between varieties. Any of the green varieties would be a good place to start experimenting. (90 days)

If your planting area is a 6 hours of sun area or your weather is unseasonably cool, it will take longer for production to start and your season will likely be shorter, so plant earlier if possible. Do your research for early varieties and ones that don’t get or are mildew resistant.

Prolific crop of Green Long Beans! Vigna unguiculata sesquipedalis

Prolific crop of Green Long Beans!

PLANTING AND CARE

Companions Beans don’t mind sharing but not with onion family plants. Instead, put cucumbers at their feet, and trellis the cukes too. Keeps them clean and free of ground insects. Add some radishes to discourage Cucumber beetles – those cute little green with black dots insects. Remove them instantly. Squish, stomp, whatever it takes. Bad news, they carry bacterial diseases and viruses from plant to plant, such as bacterial wilt and mosaic virus. White potatoes repel Mexican Bean Beetles. Put potatoes on both sides of your trellis.

Soil The variety of soil needed is not strict, but well-drained soil is good. Organic matter is good, but not too much Nitrogen since as a legume, they make their own! Too much and you get leaf, no to few beans. Plant seeds about 1 inch deep about 6 inches apart. In warm zones, you can plant 2 to 3 times, at 2-week intervals, and is definitely a late summer or fall crop. Keep them moist. Fertilize as needed.

Believe me, a vertical support, trellis, wire, fence, are good for a clean harvest, otherwise your beans are on the ground, and they aren’t always easy to see among the foliage and you are stepping on them! Put your trellis up when you plant! The babies can grow quickly making it difficult to install your support system later.

Once your seedlings are up with 2 to 4 leaves, give them the royal treatment ASAP! One regular Aspirin, 1/2 teaspoon liquid dish soap (surfactant), per gallon of water. While you are at it, add a 1/4 C nonfat powdered milk and Tablespoon of Baking Soda as well. Aspirin, triggers a defense response and stimulates growth! Nonfat powdered milk is a natural germicide and boosts the immune system. Baking Soda makes the leaves alkaline and inhibits fungal spores – that’s MILDEW, the nemesis of beans that aren’t resistant! Use especially on your young bean plants, all your cucurbits – cukes, zukes, any mildew prone plant like zucchini. Use a watering can that has a rose (nozzle) that turns upward to get the undersides of leaves as well as their tops. Prevention is better than a remedy, believe me. So feel free to treat your babies after rains, once a week or as often as you can if you just can’t do once a week.

Beans are legumes, and legumes grab N, Nitrogen, right out of the air and deposit in little nodules on their roots! But. They are enthusiastic heavy producers, so a little light feeding of liquid fish/kelp mix is good at flowering time, maybe every couple of weeks. A Tablespoon in a full watering can, and later in the season too if you see the leaves yellowing. They are hungry. If you get lots of leaf and no flowers, lay off the N; rebalance your soil by adding some P, Phosphorous. P is for rapid growth, strong roots, more flower, fruit, and seed production.

Long Beans bloom in lovely pairs. Vigna unguiculata sesquipedalis

Once you get blooms, tiny beans will soon be forming. Sometimes they aren’t quite strong enough, for example when the weather is cooler, and aren’t able to push the bloom off. Give the flower a little tug and the bean will be free!

Keep your beans harvested or your plant will think it has done its job and stop producing. Harvest while they are more young for tender, crunchy juicy beans – snap! Be a little careful when harvesting so you don’t damage your plantie and open it to diseases.

Pests & Diseases

Bless aphids. Hose them off or use a spray mix that kills them and the ants but not your plant! Just test that mix on a leaf or two to know if your plant can tolerate it. I use a 1/2 and 1/2 water/alcohol mix with a dash to a 1/2 t liquid dish soap, preferably Dawn. I kill the aphids and the ants that support them. Spray sparingly.

The Mexican Bean Beetle is a species of lady beetle, looks like one too. It is a notorious agricultural pest, one of the few lady beetles that feed on plants rather than other insects. They are yellowish-brown, 1/4-inch beetles with 16 black spots on their wing covers. They bother green beans more than Long beans. Growing your rows of beans between rows of potatoes helps. See all about them at Mother Earth News!

The other bean pest is white flies. Ugh. Spray those little buggers away with your hose and invite them to not come back! Check daily until they are GONE. See IPM

Mildew is a common disease, but there are varieties that have NO mildew at all. This was proven to me when two kinds of green long beans were grown at our community garden at the same time, 16′ away from each other. We had a Chinese gardener and a Vietnamese gardener. At the time I had no particular interest in long beans, and didn’t know the significance of the difference. Oh, how I wish I had. I would have gotten the names of the varieties. One of them had no mildew whatsoever! I highly recommend you search for the mildewless varieties! See the prevention mix above!

Delicious Red Noodle Long Beans! Vigna unguiculata sesquipedalisHarvests! There are two kinds!

First are those tasty fresh handfuls you carry to the kitchen!

Second is at the end of the season when you save seeds from your healthiest monster producing plants! They are the most localized to your garden space and you. It’s as simple as waiting for the pods to dry on the vine, collecting the seeds, and completely drying them again, well before storing in jars in a cool place. Check on those jars a week or two later to be sure no insects have hatched.

Plentiful GOOD FOOD!

Nutritious! Beans are high in fiber, have diverse antioxidant carotenoids, give a quarter of your day’s requirements of vitamin K, a fat-soluble vitamin that’s important for healthy bones and blood clotting, and are a good source of absorbable silicon.

Long Beans are luscious and can be prepared variably to your happiness! They taste good right off the vine, young and slender or chop dropped in a cool summer salad with a special dressing! They are yummy lightly steamed, buttered or drizzled with olive oil, or a sauce of your choosing. Chop in very short sections, add to omelettes. Chop in 2″ diagonal sections for soups, stews! Pickle or go probiotic! Go Southern-style with ham or bacon and butter, roasted, chilled in salads, stir fried or sautéed with sauces and garlic! Hungry?! Mix ’em in your mashed potatoes or with fermented bean curd! Add them to breakfast omelets or a special quiche!

Super tasty International Options! You can use your long beans interchangeably with green beans, but they give dishes that different mysterious flavor that Long Beans have! Snake River Seed Cooperative says ‘Delicious, uniquely flavored beans add authenticity to Asian stir fries and curries. A staple in Thai curries, they’re also delicious lightly steamed on their own.’ Try in the popular Szechuan dish ‘Dryfried Beans.’ In Malaysia, they are stir fried with chillies and shrimp paste (sambal) or put in cooked salads (kerabu). In the Philippines yardlong beans are usually boiled, cooked in coconut milk with cubes of squash, or cooked adobo style with soy sauce and optionally a meat like pork. Try all these recipes! Freeze some for quick tasty winter meals!  

May your Long Beans be Many and Long!

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The Green Bean Connection newsletter started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is.

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic! Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

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