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Father's Day Garden Gifts
A group of fathers and their children meet weekly in New York for outings, including to the Ancient Playground in Central Park.

Growing children is #1, Organic Veggie Gardening is super for the whole family’s health, so gardening Papas need good green respect!

This year surprise him with a sleep in, or an outdoor Sunrise breakfast with a beautiful view! Could have a Summer Solstice Sunrise Gathering at the garden! At the breakfast table, what more wonderful than a centerpiece of living plants or beautiful flowers from your garden and delicious 100% fresh garden to table treats?!

Plant a planter box, a cut and come again lettuce bowl
Give him garden gear! Special tools, a composter, bee box
Give him seedlings and seeds
How about a garden magazine/ezine subscription?
Membership, a plot, at a Community Garden
Plant edible flowers for him that he will love
Offer him some of your time weeding, turning in amendments
Maybe he could use some of your homemade organic compost or worm castings
He might need a compost tea brewer set up…
How about a selection of lovely herbal soaps?!
If you aren’t sure what to get, give him a gift certificate at his favorite nursery or the best nursery in town! Support your local businesses that know your area and give us the best local in-person advice!

Special gift! Fresh organic salad in a Mason jar? Yum!

Super delicious nutritious Mason Jar meals!

A fresh gathered Bouquet Garni tied with a hearts ribbon
Bundles of fresh herbs he can hang and dry in his kitchen

Herbed oils and vinegars in pretty jars

Maybe he is a she! There are plenty of Moms doing a Dad’s job out there, busy single Moms who love to garden!

Happy Father’s Day in advance to all you loving people!

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The Green Bean Connection newsletter started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic!

 

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March is the earliest time for Tomatoes, April is better!Here are March and April compared so you can get an idea of your timing, and plan your succession plantings. If you are planting for canning, plant the amount you need all at once. The first week of March is considered by many to be the first time for Summer Planting! Per UC Cooperative Extension, ‘If the soil temperature has reached 60 to 65°F and the nighttime air temperatures are consistently above 50°F, it is time to plant tomato and pepper transplants. Wait until the soil has warmed to 70°F before planting squash and melons.’ Santa Barbara, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden, coastal ground temps are still only 50+ degrees at 8 AM, and forecasts indicate nighttime temps are heading back into the 40s, so wait a bit for in-the-ground seed planting! Some transplants may not do well in this cooler soil either. Just because they are at a nursery doesn’t mean it’s the right time to buy them. Seriously. See Savio’s notes below in blue. Let’s wait until mid March at least, and see how things are then – that’s only two more weeks. That said….

MARCH– Tomatoes! Few gardeners can keep themselves from planting cold tolerating quick maturing tomatoes as early as March! Be warned though, as Dee at La Sumida says, likely, no matter when you plant you won’t get first red fruit until July 4th! Ripening depends on day length as well as temps, but if it’s hot, we may be lucky and get a few sooner! 🙂 Btw, La Sumida has the largest tomato selection in the Santa Barbara area! Ask for Judi to help you with your veggie questions. Heirlooms are particularly susceptible to the wilts, Fusarium and Verticillium. Instead, get varieties that have VFN or VF on the tag at the nursery. The V is for Verticillium, the F Fusarium wilt, N nematodes. Ace, Early Girl, Champion, Celebrity, are some that are wilt resistant/tolerant.

Outdoors, sow or transplant beets, carrots, celery, chard, herbs, Jerusalem artichokes, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuces, green onions, bulb onion seed and sets (be sure to get summer- maturing varieties), parsley, peas, peanuts, potatoes, radishes, shallots, spinaches, strawberries, and turnips. Transplant broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and kohlrabi seedlings. Winter squash NOW, so it will have a long enough season to harden for harvest. Sprinkle Mycorrhiza fungi right on the roots of your transplants when you put them in the ground. It increases uptake of nutrients, water, and phosphorus that helps roots and flowers grow and develop. Ask for it at Island Seed & Feed in Goleta.

Depending on ground temps, tuck in some bean seeds where the peas are finishing, intermingled with cucumber seeds that will grow below the beans, plus a few dill to go with the cukes! Plant radishes with the cukes to deter the Cucumber beetles. Squash! Plant some corn in blocks, not rows, for good pollination! If you lay in some cukes, melons or winter squash, to ramble among the corn, soon as they are tall enough, put down a good thick straw mulch to keep their leaves and fruit off the ground.

This is the LAST MONTH to transplant artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale; also strawberry, blackberry, and raspberry roots so they’ll bear fruit well this year.

Indoors, sow eggplant, peppers, and more tomatoes for transplanting into the garden in late April or early May. Also Cucumbers, eggplants, melons, squash and sweet potatoes. Time for heat-resistant, bolt-resistant lettuces of all kinds!

Tend your compost, plan your garden, do further SOIL preparation for plant happiness.

APRILNow we’re talking true heat lovers time! Eggplant, limas, melons (wait until May for cantaloupe), okra and peppers, pumpkins! Many wait until April to plant tomatoes. Sow or transplant asparagus, beets, carrots, celery, chard, corn, herbs, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, heat-tolerant leaf lettuce, okra, summer-maturing onions, parsley, peanuts, the last peas (choose a heat-tolerant variety such as Wando), white potatoes, radishes, rhubarb, and spinach. April 1 IS JICAMA PLANTING DAY! If you miss it, plant ASAP! All about Jicamas!

Transplant early-maturing varieties of beans, cucumbers, eggplants, melons, peppers, squash, and tomatoes that will tolerate cooler soil temperatures. Wait on cantaloupe, ‘cz they will do better started in May.

Grow herbs for beauty and table taste!! Sow or transplant basil, borage, chervil, chives, cilantro, comfrey, dill, fennel, lavender, marjoram, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, and thyme. Be mindful where you plant them… Mediterranean herbs from southern France, like lavender, marjoram, rosemary, sage, savory, and thyme, do well in hot summer sun and poor but well-drained soil with minimal fertilizer. On the other hand, basil, chives, coriander (cilantro), and parsley thrive in richer soil with more frequent watering. Wise planting puts chives where you need to repel Bagrada Bugs, by your broccoli, kale, but away from peas if you are still growing some. Cilantro, a carrot family workhorse, discourages harmful insects such as aphids, potato beetles and spider mites, attracts beneficial insects when in bloom. Dill is a natural right next to the cucumbers since you will use the dill if you make pickles. They mature about the same time.

Good Homes for Good Bugs! Lure their natural enemies ― hoverflies, lacewings, ladybugs, and parasitic wasps ― by planting chamomile, cosmos, marigold and yarrow.

Here are some WISE WORDS from Yvonne Savio, Program Manager and Master Gardener Coordinator for Los Angeles County’s University of California Cooperative Extension: ‘Wait until the end of the month to sow or transplant vegetables and fruits that prefer very warm weather to mature–including beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplants, melons, peppers, pumpkins, and squash. They will do better when they have consistently warm soil and air temperatures. Planting them into the soil when air temperatures are still cool results in growth stress which is difficult for the plants to overcome. Peppers, especially, will just “sulk” if their roots are chilled, and they won’t recuperate quickly [if ever] – best to just wait till the soil has warmed before planting them.’ I couldn’t agree more. I have done exactly what she warns against and can say the results aren’t happy. Sigh.

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March 6  Orchid Greenhouse Exchange
1 to 3, 5155 Camino Floral  As with all Neighborhood Exchanges:  Bring whatever you have this time or year, or a baked good to share, or something garden related: an article of interest to pass around, etc..  But do come, no matter as we all get something out of being together!

March 12! 10 AM How to Grow More Delicious Edibles Per Square Foot Than You Ever Thought Possible! That will include 10 Space Saving Strategies and 11 Practices for Higher Yields! Cerena Childress, a Master Gardener presentation at La Sumida NurseryRain or shine. Class is FREE!  Would love for you to join us!

March 11 to 13  International Orchid Show Earl Warren Showgrounds, U.S. Hwy 101 at Las Positas  805-969-5746

Saturday, March 19 San Roque Garden Exchange 10-1  1440 Jesusita Lane

March 20  Happy Spring Equinox!

March 26  Fairview Gardens, Urban Homesteading, all day 9 to 5, Garden Layout & Bed Prep, Lasagna Gardening! Mark Tollefson. Lasagna gardening, a layered approach, creates highly aerated soils with high fertility. Discover how to use this system to grow many vegetables in a small space and at a higher rate of efficiency and productivity.    $85.00

Sign up in advance for April 30 Sheet Mulching – The Lazy Gardener’s Guide to Growing, all day 9 to 5    $85
June 4 & 5 Introduction to Permaculture: 2 Day program Two full days $195
June 18 Container Gardening – Gardening for small spaces 9 am to 12 pm $40

Earth Day 2011 Powered By the People” April 16, 17

The Community Environmental Council (CEC) will host the Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival at Alameda Park Saturday, April 16 and Sunday, April 17, 2011. The 2011 theme, “Powered by the People,” is in line with the CEC’s Fossil Free by ’33 campaign and emphasizes the power of daily choices in making Santa Barbara one of the first fossil-free communities in the nation.

The festival will feature approximately 250 exhibitors, a free valet bike parking section that is expected to hold over 1,000 bikes, and the third annual Green Shorts Film Festival. It will also include the festival’s 11th Green Car Show – featuring the largest collection of efficient and alternative fueled vehicles between Los Angeles and San Francisco and the longest-running show of its kind in the country.

Volunteer, attend, do come and enjoy!

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The 3rd Annual Seed Swap was a great success!  I found some great fava beans donated by Tom Shepherd, Shepherd Farms.  I’m still looking for some jicama seeds.  There were wonderful talks, was lively music, new friendships made, and, of course, seeds gathered for mighty planting!  If you didn’t make it this year, be sure to come next year! 

Feb 5 Banana Plantation & Mulching Party at Mesa Harmony Garden!  8 AM to 1 PM, Holy Cross Church, Meigs/Cliff Dr.  Wheelbarrows, picks, pitchforks, shovels needed – bring if you can!  Over 100 fruit and nut trees have been planted already, now it’s BANANA planting time!  Come see the 34 plot community garden and the project!  Get inspired!  

Feg 14  Happy Valentine’s Day! 

Feb 19 The Seed Ball Making Party!  11 AM to 4  PM at Plaza de Vera Cruz  – across the street from the Saturday Farmer’s Market, where Sol Foods Festival was.   If there is rain the new location will be posted on eatthestreet.org.  If you have seeds to share, please do bring them.  And bring some snacks or dishes to share if you wish!

What is a seed ball?  Think of them like this:  Little Adobe Gardens  Imagine then, a clay ball the size of a large marble. Imagine also that it contains seeds for a complete habitat. The seed ball could contain plant potential for an entire ecosystem.  It can be made by anyone, anywhere in the world where there is clay, compost, seed and water.  The ball is tossed wherever you want to plant, rain moistens it, the clay ‘melts’ its nutrients into the surrounding soil and blankets the seeds with minerals & vitamins.  Covered & moist, they germinate, voila!  Flowers!  Or veggies! 

In honor of Masanobu Fukuoka, the Father of Seed Balls, The Story of Seed Balls by Jim ‘Catfish’ Bones:


Feb 27  Santa Barbara Guerilla Planting Day!  The Seed Ball Party is purposely planned to precede a day of Guerilla Planting, planting anything and anywhere, respectfully!  Particularly it is emphasizing planting unused land – flowers or vegetables!  Some people will be planting trees!  Several downtown Santa Barbara businesses are already planning creative events!  One brewery is going to plant Barley!   

Feb 26  10 AM  Vegetable Gardening with Oscar Carmona  La Sumida NurseryRain or shine. Class is free! 

Feb 26-27 Santa Barbara Spring Home & Garden Expo!  HOME should be an experience, not just an address. 
Earl Warren Showgrounds     Saturday 10 – 5,  Sunday 10 – 4
Admission: Adults $6.00, Kids 12 & under are free  Parking: Free
*A portion of the proceeds benefit the Community Environmental Council (CEC) 

Fairview Gardens Urban Homesteading is an exciting new series of classes scheduled throughout the year.  Some of the classes filled the first day the announcement was made, so sign up right away for any you are considering, and ask to be on a list for a 2nd group to be formed!   It is a wonderful way to reconnect with the earth. The series, designed by the staff at Fairview, covers everything from container gardening, composting and raising chickens, to canning, preserving, and more, taught by the best people in our community on site at the farm.  (805)967-7369  info@fairviewgardens.org

Apr 16 & 17, CEC’s Earth Day Festival 2011!

Give your Valentine a basket of veggies and some seeds to plant!  Have a great month!

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Other Community Gardens   

Full Circle Farm, Sunnyvale CA

 

Some community gardens are larger and have different purposes!  Full Circle Farm is 11 acres!  It is an organic educational farm funded by nonprofit Sustainable Community Gardens. One of their goals is to put ‘fresh food in Santa Clara Unified School District cafeterias.’   Their ‘About Us’ page says:  Programs being developed include a science and nutrition elective for 6-8th graders, a farm-based apprenticeship program for teenagers, a mentoring program where at-risk teens lead elementary youth in garden and nutrition workshops, and a variety of school field trip programs.    

As a team, young people grow their own food, and develop critical life skills of communication, teamwork, leadership, decision-making, and problem-solving through practical, hands-on agricultural and entrepreneurial experiences.  If you will be up that way over the summer, here’s where to visit:  1055 Dunford Way, Sunnyvale, CA 94087
View Map    

Good Green Thinking! 

From Mother Earth News:  Grow $700 of Food in 100 Square Feet!  4 great tips from Rosalind Creasy & Cathy Wilkinson Barash:    

  1. Choose indeterminate tomatoes. They keep growing and producing fruit until a killing frost. (Determinate varieties save space but ripen all at once.) 
  2. In spring, plant cool-season vegetables, including lettuce, mesclun and stir-fry green mixes, arugula, scallions, spinach and radishes. They are ready to harvest in a short time, and they act as space holders until the warm-season veggies fill in. 
  3. Grow up. Peas, small melons, squash, cucumbers and pole beans have a small footprint when grown vertically. Plus, they yield more over a longer time than bush types.   
  4. Plants such as broccoli, eggplant, peppers, chard and kale are worth the space they take for a long season. As long as you keep harvesting, they will keep producing until frost   

The expanded second edition of Rosalind Creasy’s landmark book, Edible Landscaping, will be released in Spring 2010.

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