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Posts Tagged ‘Scaly-breasted’

Rancheria Community Garden Santa Barbara CA Bird, Scaly-breasted Munia, Spice Finch - Lonchura punctulata

I didn’t have my camera with me, but here are the finches I saw!

Male Scaly-breasted munia or spotted munia (Lonchura punctulata), known in the pet trade as nutmeg mannikin or spice finch. This pair is feeding on grains.

If you have seen these under brush, in the shade, from the top, at a distance, you may have missed the black and white pattern underneath. And females and the children, juveniles, look different, a very plain beigey gray, no black and white. The morning of September 23 I was blessed to see two males hanging out in 9′ corn tops at Rancheria Community Garden. The early morning sun was full on them so I got a rich view of their unusual colors. I was charmed!

Birds are one reason we let some plants seed out. In later fall, they need the food when we need the seeds for next year’s planting!

Per Wiki, this munia eats mainly grass seeds [keeping our weeding down] apart from berries and small insects [less pests!]. They forage in flocks and communicate with soft calls and whistles. The species is highly social and may sometimes roost with other species of munias and other birds as well. This species is found in tropical plains and grasslands. Breeding pairs construct dome-shaped nests using grass or bamboo leaves.

Hmm…in many areas it is regarded as an agricultural pest, feeding in large flocks on cultivated cereals such as rice. In Southeast Asia, the scaly-breasted munia is trapped in large numbers for Buddhist ceremonies, but most birds are later released.

Though common, maybe you too have never seen these before. Keep a lookout for our feathered friends. They are often responsible for, uh, prefertilized volunteer seeds! Volunteers can be a spice of life – a delicious surprise brought by Mother Nature, a learning experience, great fun!

If you are wondering if you can expect to see these sweet little birds, per David Bell, ‘In California Scaly-breasted Munias are locally common in San Diego, Ventura, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties especially in riparian habitat. They also occur locally in the south San Francisco bay area and a few other scattered locations. They are common in the Houston, TX area. They also occur in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, although they are generally less common there.’

Take your time when you see small birds around. Focus a wee bit more. Look for some details! Good luck, they are little beauties!

In Santa Barbara, if you find a sick or injured bird contact Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network: Office: (805) 681-1019        Email: contact@sbwcn.org     Helpline: (805) 681-1080      Bless you.



The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for our SoCal Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

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