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Posts Tagged ‘rust’

Handsome Hardneck Garlic at Ontos Farm, Australia
Ontos Farm in Australia says the flavour of the garlic also depends on soil and climate. The ideal climate is cool with cold winters and no rain after October, our April, during the bulb filling period. Santa Barbara CA climate may be getting a little too warm to grow garlic? Most of this ‘winter’ here has been like summer.

The question was ‘What do you think of bleach as a rust treatment?’

Bleach is safe to use; you can try it. 1/4 c per gallon of water, drench your plant once a day for a week. If that seems to be working, try maintenance applications once a week after that. But. I’m not seeing it referenced online as a rust cure. In fact, I’m not seeing anything where anyone reports success getting rid of rust. Rust is wind-borne and once in your soil, it’s the devil to pay.

I let it be on my large bunch onions. Pulling away infected leaves, I use the remaining central stems, which is all I need. But the reports about garlic are that rust infected plants have stunted dry bulbs. Unfortunately that would be more so as you remove infected leaves, reducing the plant’s ability to grow. More energy goes into survival than production. It might ‘catch up,’ but it takes a long time to grow anyway, so not really worth the wait.

UC Davis has little to say, crop rotation, get rid of infected plants, use a fungicide. What commercial organic growers do is probably the best solution. It’s a strong fungus. DO NOT COMPOST infested plants and spread rust throughout your soil by applying that compost. Maybe sometimes polite, cute or light weight organic remedies work; often they don’t. This is one of the times it doesn’t. When I had cancer I did both alternative stuff and heavy hitting chemo and radiation. It worked. I would put cancer and rust just about in the same category. Neem is probably the toughest of organic remedies I saw mentioned and online reports are it doesn’t work on rust either.

Prevention. Others mention shade and soil issues. Right now our Pilgrim Terrace community gardener Shannon has over 2′ tall garlic with not a speck of rust on them! She makes super prodigious steer manure/alfalfa compost and uses it generously every year. Religion. You can just see there is a lot of soil organism action happening. Her soil is ALIVE! She plants a lot of garlic because her Sweetie loves it. She also gets great okra, another heavy feeder. I would start with your soil. Make it super rich. Don’t be squeamish about manures. Use the righteous potent stuff. Alfalfa is more nutritious than straw, poor man’s alfalfa. Alfalfa is high in nitrogen where straw is really best for aeration as a mulch. Shannon mulches generously with straw, so her plants are being fed from above and below.

Since soil infestation is a problem, just start with new soil each year! Remove entire old beds immediately after harvest if you decide to let your infected plants grow through for the small bulbs. Take that soil somewhere away from where you are planting; spread it out thinly so it will dry out, causing the fungus to die. You could use it as a ‘mulch’ in landscape areas where the fungus won’t hurt those other types of plants, still far, far away from garlic or onion planting areas. Before your new planting time, build new beds with super charged compost. Or if you start 2 or 3 months sooner, you could build compost in place. Thin layers of manures, kitchen green wastes, alfalfa. Throw in some worms and whatever else makes your heart sing!

Garlic The United States is the world’s largest import market for fresh garlic, in 2010 importing 164.4 million pounds of fresh garlic valued at $130 million. and 30,170 MT of dried garlic valued at $32.6 million. China accounted for the majority of total U.S. garlic imports. Being so tasty, and healthy for us, let’s successfully grow our own!

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Foliar plant care is so easy!
Use a
Dramm Can, the Perfect Foliar Machine!

Worm Castings, Compost, Manure Tea, Fish Emulsion/Kelp for FEEDING – All in ONE!

You can easily make this tea!  A handful of castings, a handful to a cup of compost, handful of manure, stir and let them soak overnight in a bucket.  In the morning, swoosh it around in the bucket one more time, let it settle, then pour the top liquid into your watering can, the one with the up turning rose.  Add a Tablespoon Fish Emulsion/Kelp, mix, and drench your plants in the morning!  Yum!

Epsom Salts, Magnesium Sulfate, Your Solanaceaes, Peppers especially, and Roses!

Magnesium is critical for seed germination and the production of chlorophyll, fruit, and nuts. Magnesium helps strengthen cell walls and improves plants’ uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur.  Magnesium deficiency in the soil may be one reason your tomato leaves yellow between the leaf veins late in the season and fruit production slows down.

Sulfur, a key element in plant growth, is critical to production of vitamins, amino acids (therefore protein), and enzymes.  Sulfur is probably the oldest known pesticide in current use. It can be used for disease control (e.g., powdery mildews, rusts, leaf blights, and fruit rots), and pests like mites, psyllids and thrips. Sulfur is nontoxic to mammals, but may irritate skin or especially eyes.  Sulfur has the potential to damage plants in hot (90°F and above), dry weather. It is also incompatible with other pesticides. Do not use sulfur within 20 to 30 days on plants where spray oils have been applied; it reacts with the oils to make a more phytotoxic combination.

Epsom Salts are easy to do!  Buy some Epsom Salts, what you soak your feet in, at the grocery store, mix a tablespoon per gallon, foliar feed!  Foliar feeding is simply sprinkling leaves with your solutions, and works better than applying to the soil!  Get a Dramm 5 liter long snouted watering can that has a turnable sprinkler head.  That long spout comes in handy, reaching well into your plant!  Turn the head so the water shoots up under the leaves then falls back on the tops!  The long arc of the handle gives lots of maneuvering ability!  Feed your plants once when they bloom, and again ten days later. The results, attributed to magnesium in the salts, are larger plants, more flowers, more fruit, thicker walled peppers!  I use this mix on all my Solanaceaes: eggplant, pepper, tomato, tomatillo.  Roses love it too! 

Baking Soda & Nonfat Powdered Milk for PREVENTION!

The bicarbonate of soda makes the leaf surface alkaline and this inhibits the germination of fungal spores. Baking soda prevents and reduces Powdery Mildew, and many other diseases on veggies, roses, and other plants!  It kills PM within minutes.  It can be used on roses every 3 to 4 days, but do your veggie plants every 5 to 10 days, or after significant rains, as the plant grows, because these new plant tissues are not yet protected yet by your fungicide.  Irrigate well 2 days before use; on a sunny day spray off as much of the PM as you can from plants in sunny locations.  A heaping Tablespoon baking soda to a gallon of water, with a 1/2 Teaspoon of a surfactant – insecticidal or dish soap or salad oil, does the job.  It is not effective without the surfactant to spread it and make it stick.  You can add a liquid fertilizer with it if you want.   Cautions:  1)  I have had no trouble using it on my veggies, but it may burn the leaves of some other plants, so try it on a few leaves first.  2)  Don’t apply during hot midday sun that can burn the leaves.  3)  Avoid over use – it is a sodium, salt.  For a definitive discussion of Baking Soda usage and research, see https://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/bakingsoda.html.   The article is an easy read, nicely summarized, has references, includes cautions and info on commercial preparations.  Best of all is to plant powdery mildew resistant varieties:

  • Cucumber:  Diva
  • Yellow Summer Squash:  Success, Sunray, Sunglo
  • Zucchini:  Ambassador, Wildcat
  • Pumpkin:  18 Karat Gold, Gladiator

Add nonfat powdered milk to your Baking Soda fungicide!  Powdered milk is a natural germicide, boosts your plant’s immune system!  Apply right away on young bean plants, all your cucurbits – cukes, zuchs, any mildew prone plant.  A 1/4 c milk in your gallon of water.  Get under those leaves, early morning so the leaves dry and the habitat is less humid.

Also add Salicylic acid, an aspirin to the mix! It triggers a defense response in tomatoes and other plants as well, and stimulates growth!  One regular strength dissolved/gallon does the job.

Healthy plants and abundant production are so rewarding!  Just take a few minutes to give your plants a boost with these simple treatments!  Whether Dramm, or another can, get yourself a good one!  Make it easy to get up under those leaves!  Otherwise, you are treating only 1/2 your plant!

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