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Posts Tagged ‘probiotics’

Nothing wasted, inexpensively made, thankfully eaten!

Strawberry Rhubarb Refrigerator Jam!  Delicious way to store your harvest!

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From Mother Earth News!
Sleeping Quarters for Cool Dry Storage Crops
 Store your Veggies under the bed!
Winter Squash, acorn squash, potatoes, pumpkins! Note those clear containers so you can see what’s in ’em without tugging the container out, lifting the lid….

Freezing is easy!  From Inhabitat:  Chop those ripened fruits and veggies up and freeze them for use on a future occasion. You can freeze items such as bell peppers, green beans, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, celery, cucumbers, onions, eggplant, mushrooms, strawberries, blueberries, bananas… and the list goes on! Just make sure you blanch them in hot water before sticking them in below freezing temperatures. Blanching neutralizes bacteria present in foods, delaying spoilage.  [Make pesto ice cubes!]

Veggies Storage - Freeze, convenient ready to use!


Lacto fermentation, Probiotics! 
From cook.eat.think.

Denise says:  While I love the twang of vinegar based pickled vegetables, I definitely think there is a place on the table for lacto fermented vegetables. The lacto fermentation leaves you with a heady flavor of the original vegetable, a salty brineyness (well, it should be a word) and that nice crispy bite. Another thing I love about lacto fermentation – in addition to the healthy benefits – is that it is easy to make in small batches. It isn’t a whole kitchen all day canning extravaganza if you don’t want it to be. I often make a pint of this, a quart of that, little by little – whatever you have leftover. Having some nice pickles on the side with dinner is really yummy and they also are always wonderful on a snack platter type of thing.

Veggie Storage - easy to do Lacto Fermentation, Healthy Probiotics

Or if you want a bit of color, try pickling  your veggies this artistic ornamental Russian style per AvantGardens! Great gifts either way!

Pickling Vegetables Artistic Ornamental Russian Style AvantGardens

Drying for healthy munching, lightweight snacks for school, bike ride, camp or trail!  Sun dried, hung from the rafters, or dehydrator style, from figs to strawberries, fruit rolls to kale chips, herbal flavorings and remedies, carrots to ‘maters!  Concentrated flavor, take up little space!

Veggie Storage - Dry your Apples, Tomatoes, Strawberries!

Laura Macklem is proud of her new Half Gallon Ball Jars!

What you can’t eat yourself, share fresh or in storage containers! It’s a super healthy gift for someone who doesn’t have a garden or can’t garden, for busy parents, singles on the go, schoolkids, when someone’s not feeling well! So appreciated.

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Homemade Pickles are high in Probiotics!Believe it or not, the homemade common green pickle is an excellent probiotics food source.  So is homemade sauerkraut, considered a probiotic super food! And the ‘sauerkraut’ can be made of any of the Brassica family plants – broccoli, cabbage – green or red is fine, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, kale, bok choy, kohlrabi, etc.  These plants have the same bacteria as in yogurt, and the bacteria does all the work naturally!

Probiotics?  Say what?  What are they and why would you want them?!

Per WebMD.com ‘Probiotics are organisms such as bacteria or yeast that are believed to improve health. They are available in supplements and foods. The idea of taking live bacteria or yeast may seem strange at first. After all, we take antibiotics to fight bacteria. But our bodies naturally teem with such organisms. The digestive system is home to more than 500 different types of bacteria. They help keep the intestines healthy and assist in digesting food. They are also believed to help the immune system.’

Pickling cucumbers are fun to grow, crunchy tasty off the vine, and the survivors are easy to make into pickles!  Basically, use any mix of spices that pleases you, add it to your jars.  Wash, leave whole or cut to fit, and puncture your cukes – so the brine is better absorbed, stuff them into the jar too.  Make a salt and water brine, pour it over them a 1/2″ more than the height of the cukes.  Ferment a few days and they’re yours!

HellaDelicious uses a marvelous spice mix (below), and has great tips on her page by page recipe – see all the details!  Or just do water and salt, forget all the spices!  But, I’ll bet you have a few of these spices handy and could quickly throw in a few, just your favorites, of course!  Be creative!  This works for any veggies you would like to pickle – cauliflower, beans, asparagus, onions, carrot slices, beets, tomatoes!

  • small handful fennel seeds (you gathered from an unsprayed place)
  • 6-10 black peppercorns
  • 1 T mustard seeds
  • 5-7 cloves
  • 5-6 cloves of garlic, sliced (you grew your own)
  • dill flower heads and leaves (you grew it next to your cukes)
  • small handful of coriander seeds (cilantro you let bolt and seed)
  • 1 horseradish root, sliced (fresh is great but it’s highly invasive)
  • cinnamon bark

You may enjoy A cheater’s guide to quick pickling almost anything by wild Brooklynite pickler Kenji Magrann-Wells.

Now.  Before you go running off to the grocery store to buy pickles and sauerkraut, know that, per Sarah, the Healthy Home Economist,

Foods that are pickled are those that have been preserved in an acidic medium. In the case of various types of supermarket pickles on the shelf, the pickling comes from vinegar. These vegetables, however, are not fermented (even though vinegar itself is the product of fermentation) and hence do not offer the probiotic and enzymatic value of homemade fermented vegetables.

Vegetables that you ferment in your kitchen using a starter, salt, and some filtered water create their own self preserving, acidic liquid that is a by-product of the fermentation process. This lactic acid is incredibly beneficial to digestion when consumed along with the fermented vegetables or even when sipped alone as anyone on the GAPS Intro Diet has discovered (cabbage juice anyone?). In other words, homemade fermented veggies are both fermented and pickled.  [Be sure to read the comments on her page too!]

She says not only are there probiotics, but these homemade foods

  • Enhance the vitamin content of the food.
  • Preserve and sometimes enhance the enzyme content of the food.
  • Improve nutrient bio-availability in the body.
  • Improve the digestibility of the food and even cooked foods that are consumed along with it!

To your excellent health and the great sport of pickling and krauting!

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The Green Bean Connection newsletter started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden, then became this blog too! All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic!

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