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Posts Tagged ‘permaculturist’

Raised bed Hugelkultur Lasagna Combo Buckman Style

Australian permaculturist Rosina Buckman has some terrific tank garden tips!  She says think of your raised bed as a compost pile!  That’s efficient!  Place it wisely to get the most sun, least cold wind.  This bottomless tank is a tidy look even for the front yard!
Rosina combines a mini Hugelkultur process and Lasagna layering, composting in place!

  • Hugelkultur puts logs, branches, twigs at the bottom of the pile.
  • Rosina puts a rough mulch on top of that.
  • Then she Lasagnas a layer of green/wet grass clippings, or the like, to dampen the dry layers below.
  • Newspaper or cardboard is next.  Make sure it is completely super soggy.
  • Lay compost on that.  Throw in a few handfuls of red worms!
  • A topping of Straw mulch allows aeration yet keeps the compost moist!

The beauty of branches and twigs at the bottom of your raised bed is the decomposition process, which takes a long time, heats the soil above, allowing earlier planting and extending your summer season into fall!
Neighbors contribute their high quality nutritious kitchen trim, which can be part of the ‘green’ layer or dug in anytime, anywhere!
Ms Buckman tells how to ‘wake up’ your soil with a ‘cocktail of Kelp or Seaweed extract which you can buy in concentrate form known as Maxicrop in the US or Seasol in Australia!’  You can do it yourself with a ‘small cup of each ingredient (liquid kelp/molasses) mixed with a bucket of water’ to speed up the growth of microorganisms.  [Why not add a 1/2 cup to a cup of fish emulsion too?!]

Admin at this site says:  One important point that needs to be made about this raised tank garden. There is NO metal Bottom to the Tank Garden. It has no base. The tank is just a hoop to hold all your organic matter in. Water is allowed to escape at the bottom and leach out into the surrounding soil. Do not use tanks with a metal base. If you have a tank with a metal base – consider turning it into a Wicking Bed Garden. Some people say wicking beds are the very best way to garden because you will never need to water your garden.  Read about how to make one here.

See more at EcoFilms

I’m always encouraging you to make good soil because it is the living foundation of your garden!  Healthy soil; an abundance of yummy veggies!

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July is not so much a planting month as water, sidedressing, harvest, and making compost – soil prep for September & October fall plantings! Get seeds!
August is keeping your soil water absorbent, sidedressing, harvesting, plant a last round of summer favorites, start cool-season seedlings, time to preserve your abundance for winter eating, to take stock and make notes for next year’s summer planting!
September is exciting because it is the first month to plant fall veggies! Do your final harvesting, preserving, clean up, chop and compost, and plant on Labor Day weekend!
October is considered by many to be the best planting month of the year!! Time to take up strawberry daughters (runners) for November planting, clean up to break pest and disease cycles, plant your winter veggies, plant more veggies if you started in September!

Tomato-Hot Juicy July!

Plant another round of your summer favs if you want, but keep in mind that Sep/Oct are the best fall planting months, so check those dates to maturity! The sooner you start your winter plants, the faster start they have, the sooner you have winter veggies. Things get slower as it gets cooler. And, heat lovers started now will have a shorter harvest period. Just saying.
Watering  Keep your veggies well watered, daily on extra hot days. Seedlings may need water 2 to 3 times a day! Keep strawberries moist or they will stop producing. It tomatoes dry out, they drop their blossoms. Water short rooted plants, beans, lettuces, cukes, more frequently. They like lots of water!
Mulch short rooted plants, beans, lettuces and strawberries, and deeper rooted chard, to keep them cool and moist. More about summer mulching.
Feeding  Get out your fish emulsion, get some manures, and feed your plants! Foliar feed with compost, manure, worm casting tea. Epsom salts your peppers. Seabird guano (NOT bat guano) keeps plants flowering and producing!  Blood meal is a quick Nitrogen fix for yellowing leaves.
Prep your fall raised beds! Start making compost for fall planting. Chop into small pieces for faster decomposition.
Install gopher wire barriers in your new beds. Incorporate manures and already-made compost into your soil.
Get the best varieties of seeds for Sep/Oct planting!
Let strawberry runners grow now.
Harvest!
Do keep up so your plants keep producing.  What you can’t eat or preserve, give away!  It will be so appreciated!

I’m passing this along from a Linda Buzzell-Saltzman, Santa Barbara Organic Garden Club post:

This article is by Robyn Francis, one of Australia’s top permaculturists.  She’s also a pioneer in rethinking international aid.

“While mental health experts warn about depression as a global epidemic, other researchers are discovering ways we trigger our natural  production of happy chemicals that keep depression at bay, with surprising results. All you need to do is get your fingers dirty and harvest your own food.  “In recent years I’ve come across two completely independent bits of research that identified key environmental triggers for two important chemicals that boost our immune system and keep us happy – serotonin and dopamine.  What fascinated me as a permaculturist and gardener were that the environmental triggers happen in the garden when you handle the soil and harvest your crops…”

Smile and be wild!
Cerena

Next week, Composting Made EASY! 

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