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Posts Tagged ‘Outdoor’

I had to laugh when I saw this image and its reference to an ‘unsightly back yard!’ It was in the Washington Times Magazine Section April 29, 1906, listing Facts & Figures on how much you can save by gardening. They spoke of how it ‘enter[s] the mind every spring and summer,’ and, of course, here today in SoCal in the Fall as well when ‘winter’ planting is late August to October! Perfect timing to have come across this at a season change planting time!

You gotta see the before and after images, check out historical thinking and process, how gardening was different then and yet the same as today! See a large readable image here.(5.2MB)

So how about it?! LOL! Do you have an unsightly back yard that could be converted? And how hard would it be to do that?!

1 Cost of your time – Gain of outdoor communion with the sky, the earth, plants and creatures – soil organisms, tiny, furry, scaly, feathered, amazing insects

2 Some sore muscles? Maybe. Overall health improves, for some dramatically! The freshest from garden to table. No plastics, no food miles pollution. Likely some morning dew on your feet….

3 Purchase tools, gloves, soil builders, seeds, transplants. The organic veggies return will more than pay for those in one season. You get to make great new friends at the nursery!

4 Yes, there will be wins and losses, some losses inexplicable. But, oh, the satisfaction! Proud of your harvests, your heart feels happy to share your bounty with friends, loved ones, and if enough, donate.

5 There is some daily care that makes sense. Things grow better that way. A little water, weed pulling, this and that. For many it’s like a quiet time after work, a meditation. But no over watering!

One of the gardeners in the Times article produced so much she and her children sold their extra at market and paid their 1906 taxes on their home with that income!

If the unsightly backyard doesn’t call you, what about that unsightly front yard?!

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Adult Black Soldier Fly, Hermetia illucens

Maggots. Icky.  Ewww!  Yuck.  Ok, got that out.  Did you even know this could happen?!  Have you been afraid to ask about, admit to it, because it’s so ugly? Ok, gardener therapy time…. Maggots are really nothing weird, they are the larvae of black soldier flies (Hermetia illucens), often referred to as BSF, a native-to-the-Americas fly whose amazing environmental usefulness is now known. In fact, you may already know BSF as Phoenix Worms, sold in Pet stores as food for fish, birds and reptiles. They became the first feeder insect to be granted a U.S. registered trademark in 2006!

They don’t look like I expected, and, instead, are rather interesting and polite! Adults do not sting or bite, don’t carry diseases, do not feed at all. They mate, look for a place to lay eggs, die within 2 days! There are a lot of different ones and the males differ from the females. If you see pale yellow or cream colored eggs in masses that contain as many as 500 eggs, my response now is Thank you! Some wonder if they’re cockroach eggs. They’re not, thank goodness! The grubs, maggots, or larvae, can be anywhere from white to a dark brown. More about them

Answer ONE!  Maggots are not going to hurt your compost, but they may be a sign that your balance of green materials/brown materials is off. Make sure you are adding enough (but not too much) brown stuff like straw. Also it may be too moist; it should feel like a wrung out sponge. If it is too wet or has too much green material (food waste, grass, fresh leaves) in relation to brown, it can become slimy and rotten smelling and attract lots of maggots. If you really can’t stand them you can get some lime (this is organic) and dust your compost with it. It will deal with the maggots and you will still have good compost, but it will increase the pH of the compost.

A word about LIME – Liming

It is normally not necessary to add lime to your compost pile to improve the breakdown of most yard wastes. Finished compost is usually slightly alkaline. If you add lime during the decomposition process, it will probably be too alkaline when completed. If your pile contains large amounts of acidic materials such as pine needles or fruit wastes, you might add lime, but no more than one cup per 25 cubic feet of material. Excessive lime application can lead to loss of nitrogen from the compost pile.

Black Soldier Fly larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae – Maggots!

Answer TWO! OR, decide to HAVE maggots!!!! You’ve seen the dead dry ones in your garden many times. Alive they make compost in record time! The material they are working fairly seethes. Here is a fab SFGate link all about them: Yucky but useful: Maggots make compost by Maria Gaura, Special to The Chronicle  Saturday, July 26, 2008. It’s a read for the brave, but believe it or not, it will make you laugh! And change your ways of thinking about your compost! Did you ever think you would see these words? ‘While we’re waiting for our first shipment of BSF larvae to arrive

I first posted this August 19, 2011. Per the London, Jan. 15, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — According to a new market research report titled “Black Soldier Fly Market by Product Type (Protein Meal, Whole Dried Larvae, Oil, Biofertilizer, Live Insect, Chitin/Chitosan), Application (Animal Feed, Agriculture, Pet Food, Pharmaceutical, and Cosmetics), and Geography- Global Forecast to 2030”, published by Meticulous Research®, the global black soldier fly market will grow at a CAGR of 33.3% from 2019 to 2030 to reach $2.57 billion by 2030! See more details

BSFs are big business! Besides food for you fish, pet reptiles and chickens, they are sold to compost making businesses as well as the gear sold for those businesses. They’re also used in forensic entomology to clean bones bare. At your garden, what the maggots leave, your red worm casting making worms can eat! And, btw, maggots have no gentile needs like your delicate worms. They will eat anything biodegradable, even mountains of orange peel from the juice industry!

BSF larvae convert biowaste to protein! When they are done with your compost, they can be ground up into protein powder to feed other animals like fish you may be raising! As of Dec 2019 Forbes called BSFs The New Superstars of Sustainable Aquaculture and that they are revolutionizing the Aquaculture industry, Aquaculture production has more than doubled in the past 15 years!

There was a blog called Black Soldier Fly Blog?!?! Sure! It featured a sophisticated DIY specialized composter, with how-to image after image and videos!  The page had no less than 188 comments!

Here is a Houzz page with a LOT of great comments, and it explains and debunks myths about BSF! Especially read comments by Kelly_Slocum.

So how do you and I, home gardeners, use BSFs in our humble little gardens?

Of first importance is having enough for them to eat! Worms are much slower and may be perfect for your needs. See more Grow Garden Worms, Harvest Castings! If you have a big family and a lot of scraps, access to a grocery store waste or restaurant scraps, consider trying maggots. Soldier fly bins can be sized for a backyard or scaled up for a commercial operation.

On the flip side, you can’t fill the BSF bin full over and over because in time trying to get compost – you only get a little volume at a time, the acidity increases too much. The pH is thrown off with over-feeding. It’s going to take a little trial and error. Slower is probably better to start.

If your worms are in a container,  do not  combine the grubs with your worms! Alison Collin, Master Gardener of Inyo/Mono counties threw rotting windfall apples into an open stock tank. When she needed the tank, she was shocked to find it full of maggots! She advises: …though Black Soldier Fly larvae and red worms both like the same food, the fly larvae are extremely active [crowd out the worms and leave no food for the worms], like warm, moist conditions, and their leachate makes the soil acidic which is not good for worms. So if you have worm bins it is prudent to check them from time to time and remove any Black Soldier Fly larvae that may be present.

If your worms are in an outdoor compost pile, Anne Baley has some common sense advice: Encourage them in your compost pile by keeping green material, kitchen waste, near the top of the heap instead of burying it underneath dry leaves. Water the pile a little more than usual to help keep the moisture levels up. If soldier fly larvae seem to be taking over and crowding out the regular earthworms in your compost, bury kitchen waste under at least 4 inches of leaves, paper and other brown materials, and cut back on the moisture available to the pile.

How do you get your Soldier Flies? Australian Gavin Smith encourages using a purpose-built black soldier fly farm with images, instructions and explanations! This special home attracts them naturally. Or you can order them online! Or like Alison, throw some rotting apples where you want them and they will come, LOL! Sally G. Miller at Dave’s Garden says ‘BSF love coffee grounds. Collect a gallon or two of used coffee grounds and put them on the compost. Make sure the grounds stay moist. Dig into the grounds after a week and check for small tan wriggly “worms.” ‘

The Seasons: In the Pacific Northwest, it is recommended to ‘continue fueling the composting process for about nine months out of the year! Farmer Scott Olsen says ‘It will be warm and humid in there [the building] with lots of light because that’s what they like. … We’ll have to figure out how much energy we have to add to keep it going during the wintertime. We might be able to do that with solar or compost heat.” ‘ In our home gardens, adult soldier flies become inactive during cold months. Pupae can overwinter.

You chicken owners can be happy to know there are special growing chambers for BSFL [larvae]. When the larvae are mature, they crawl out of the food source, are channeled into a collection bucket right in the hungry chickens’ foraging area!

After eating their fill at your compost pile, soldier fly larvae crawl away to virtually disappear. The cycle continues. Along the way they become a food for birds and small creatures.

As a veggie gardener you can be glad they do not carry pathogens from manure to food items because they make great compost posthaste!

The physical reality dilemmas! A thread writer posed this comparison. ‘Most journals I’ve read say bsfl leave behind around 5% solid material, of course it depends on the food source. This seems to be pretty accurate. You can put literally hundreds of pounds of waste in a bin and have a few inches of substrate. It’s like I tell the people I teach this stuff to, if you want fertilizer and waste disposal, go with red wiggler worms, and if you want waste disposal and animal feed, go with BSFL. 

The questioner replied that she also didn’t get enough grubs to feed her chickens. She said bsfl are super at waste disposal! ‘I wouldn’t be able to compost everything from a restaurant with worms because of space considerations or because worms can’t be fed all that fat, meat and dairy that a restaurant will naturally produce.’ Bsfl have no problem. She’s considering keeping worms in a greenhouse over winter because she wants soil… Maybe she could do both?

Finished bsfl compost looks the same as other finished compost but it has one important difference! Devin Gustus at DenGarden says black soldier fly larvae compost can stunt plant growth if applied before further composting, to consider that frass “half-composted” material. Worms can easily digest the frass further, creating high quality vermicasts. Depending on who you talk with, there is a bit more to the process than what is thought at first. If you are purchasing bsfl compost, ask how it has been processed.

So here are some pros/cons. If you go with bsfl, be ready for a fast game!

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The Green Bean Connection newsletter started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is.

Love your Mother! Plant bird & pollinator food! Think grey water! Grow organic! Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

 

 

 

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