Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘nurse’

Annual Picnic at Community Garden Long Beach CA - 310 Plots!

Annual Picnic at Long Beach CA Community Garden!

Joanne is truly a Garden Heroine! She is not technically a Master Gardener but has qualifications that far exceed their requirements. She studied with Charlie Nordozzie of Southern California Garden Trials for National Gardening Magazine fame. Charlie is a nationally recognized garden writer, speaker, and radio and television personality. She also studied with professor Jacob Mittleider of the Mittleider Garden Group (worldwide method of gardening), and through good old fashioned trial and error. And she’s still learning!

For 35 years she has guided and gardened at Long Beach Community Garden. She is the second oldest gardener there now. There are 303 (20 X 30 ft – 600 sq ft) garden plots there, at $130/yr. With their year round mild/hot but not too hot weather, you can easily feed your family organic food every day of the year! She says: Our gardens have been in existence since 1976. We have 9 acres of growing space which also includes a one acre fruit orchard! 

We have new members all of the time. I try to take members month by month with what to do to be successful. Many leave because they get discouraged. [A 20 x 30 plot can be a challenge for a beginner!]

Joanne, and her dear friend Fran, just gave a class at the garden with lots of hints. Here are some she gives to us this October 2019…

  1. To prevent aphids on your cole crops [that’s fall/winter plants like Brassicas  Broccoli, Cauliflower, Kale, Cabbage, Brussels Sprouts, Collard Greens], after planting, wrap some paper plates, front and back, aluminum foil, shiny side up. Place under your plants. The reflection confuses all bugs and they leave. You can actually buy ‘SILVER MULCH‘ at Johnny’s Select Seeds. I have it but paper plates are much cheaper. Commercial growers use this.
  2. I recommend that everyone spray their cole crops with BT, Bacillus thuringiensis,  worm killer [you can get at your nursery] before they plant them. While still in seed bed or six pack. This year Fran and I are giving our planting beds soil a single spray BT before planting. Just to see if it helps.
  3. Before planting, wrap something like a single piece of newspaper round stem of each plant up to first leaves and down to where stem enters root ball. Then plant, making sure hole deep enough so that part of stem and newspaper underground and part above soil. This will make it impossible for cutworms to cut your plant’s stem leaving you with nothing.
  4.  This past Spring/Summer we were plagued with CMV, Cucumber Mosaic Virus, mostly on squash. [Yes, other plants get it too.] Well we both know if left, and not pulled out, it will infect the soil with no cure. We advised everyone to remove infected plants. Then digging down 12 inches, remove soil and bag and throw in trash. Need to do at least a circle of removal at 12 inches and then pray it works.

A word on BT, Bacillus thuringiensis. One reader says ‘It’s true that BT, Bacillus thuringiensis, is approved for certified organic agricultural use but what it does is kill all butterfly/moth caterpillars. When I was an organic CSA farmer, I bought some one year but didn’t have the heart to apply it. Given the plunging populations of insects these days, we must give extra consideration to what we kill.’ Alternatives are being researched, but the main ones lead straight to GMOs – genetically modifying our plants.

10.5.19  Joanne reports, ‘Fran and I gave a class. Have known her for 36 years. She is now sharing my garden plot as I was caring for my beloved husband who was dying of cancer. I am elderly now. Will be 90 in March but still have all my faculties. Am still strong but grieving over my loss of Jack, my husband.’

Joanne wrote this while laying in a Hospital bed in a Rehab Hospital! Was transferred after stay at Memorial Hospital. I fell, suddenly, with no aura, no loss of consciousness – am injured but no fractures but bruises and sporting a whopper black eye. Went to Emergency and home. Thirty Six hours later, same thing happened. This time I picked myself up and called paramedics. No diagnosis yet but could use a lot of prayers.
💗❤️♥️.

Joanne Rice

Get connected! She says: Check our Facebook page where I post regularly). Look for Long Beach Community Garden. It shows a picture with a wheelbarrow, Lady Bug and LBCG on the side. [Joanne’s hubby Jack was an art teacher and painted that wheelbarrow!] You can access but not post. You may ask to post.

Website! http://lbcg.org/ A little more about the garden: Our 303 plots go quickly for only $130 per year! Plots are approximately 20′ X 30′ (600 sq ft) with water access points shared by four plots. Gardening is required year-round in all plots. Every member shares 10% of their crop with the FoodBank every day, feeding 100s of people. Membership fees cover water, manure for tilth, mulch for paths and disposal of garden waste and trash. The garden also owns an orchard on site which is managed by a committee, and its fruit is shared with all members. They have an annual Garden Party, work parties, and naturally, board meetings!

Besides Joanne’s garden qualifications, she has been Head Nurse, Director of Health Care, Campus Nurse at a college, hospitals and doctors’ offices in CA, PA TN and FL! With all her technical knowledge and that big heart, no wonder she is so good with plants too!

We are so grateful for Joanne’s enormous collection of wisdom gathered over so many years, and her stupendous efforts to share as much as she can, even now from that hospital bed! Kudos, Joanne! 

If any of you live in or are visiting Long Beach, see this fine garden! This is the 908 Show – LB Community Garden vid! It’s an awesome garden. That’s Joanne! Yep she’s an elder now and she ain’t quitting!

.
Back to Top
.


See the entire October 2019 Newsletter!

Check out wonderful September 2019 images at Santa Barbara’s Rancheria Community Garden! See how much the Magical GREAT PUMPKIN weighs, fall birds, remarkable veggies, tiny seedlings, Leaffooted bug, a brand new Monarch!

The Green Bean Connection newsletter started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is.

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic! Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Read Full Post »

Mediterranean Understory & Guild Plants for Food Forests – Part 2

Please SEE Part 1 before you read this list!


Here is what a young Food Forest can look like in a part of your urban yard!

Linda’s List here is intended for a Mediterranean climate like coastal Southern California has, one of only 5 in the world. The list in your area may be different. Check out your local gardeners’ successes, check with your local nursery. This list is not tree specific yet. We’re working on that!

More than a list of plants, Linda’s List gives tips for good growing, eating, and usage!
____________________________________________________________________

Once our fruit trees are planted in their water-saving basins in a budding Mediterranean food forest, it’s now time to think about what else to plant in these usually moist wells and swales. Or up the trees? Or nearby? We need these companion plants to increase our food and medicine yield, and also to enrich the soil, provide habitat, pull up minerals and other nutrients from deep in the earth, draw nitrogen from the air and bring it into the soil, attract beneficial insects to control pests, create shade for delicate roots — and to provide beauty, a critical psychological and spiritual yield in every garden.

Thanks to the members of the Permaculture Guild of Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara Organic Garden Club for their ideas and input. Additions and corrections are welcome.  Please email lbuzzell@aol.com. Especially welcome would be input on what plants do best under specific fruit trees – so far I don’t have much information on that.

BERRIES
Blueberry. To grow well here, they need acid soil, so a container is often the best solution, since Santa Barbara soil and water tend to be alkaline. One gardener we know waters hers with a very dilute solution of white vinegar, plus puts pine needles, coffee grounds around the plant. Best in Mediterranean climates are the low-chill varieties like ‘Misty,”O’Neal,’ ‘Sharpblue’
Cane berries. Upright cane berries are fun to pop in here and there as understory plants and they take some shade. But we found out the hard way that you probably don’t want to put in sprawling, thorny berries (especially blackberry) that sucker underground – they pop up all over the yard and are hard to eradicate. When we buy new berries we limit ourselves to thornless varieties and our current favorites are ‘Navajo’ and ‘Apache,’ although the thorny varieties that still linger in our garden – and will probably be there for hundreds of years as they’re ineradicable – taste best. So we live with them and enjoy the berries.
Elderberry. Shrub. There is a California native variety. Produces edible fragrant white flowers (used to make elderberry syrup and wine) and edible small blue berries that the birds love. Ripe berries are safe to eat but leaves, twigs, branches, seeds and roots are toxic. Has medicinal uses. We use our elderberry as a sacrificial plant attracting birds away from other fruit trees.
Lemonade Berry (native). Rhus integrifolia. Can also control erosion.

BULBS AND ROOT CROPS
Placement of these may take special care, as you don’t want to plant them too close to delicate tree roots.
Carrots
Edible canna. Canna edulis –Achira. Flowers are smaller than most cannas and the root is edible, can be chopped and sautéed like potato.
Onions
Potato and sweet potato

EDIBLE FLOWERS (note: most fruit trees, veggies and herbs also have edible flowers. Always triple check the safety of any flower before eating!
Daylilies. Hemerocallis species. Buds are used in Chinese stir fry, Petals in salad.
Nasturtium (flowers, young leaves and buds that may be pickled like capers) Let the plants die back in place. They will reseed and form a straw mulch.
Roses (yield petals for salads, sandwiches, syrups, desserts; rose hips for tea, syrups, jam)
Scarlet runner bean
Scented geranium

HERBS (most have edible flowers in addition to other uses)
Borage
Chili peppers, including tree chili
Cilantro
Garlic
Italian parsley
Lavender
Lemon balm
Lemon verbena. A drought tolerant shrub with delicious leaves for tea.
Mint. Some fear its vigorous, spreading roots, but we welcome it into drier areas as ground cover, autumn bee food and a source of fresh leaves for cooking and tea.
Mustard (young leaves can be stir fried, flowers are edible, plus seeds for making mustard)
Pineapple sage (leaves and flowers make delicious herbal tea)
Oregano
Rosemary
Sage

SHRUBS/Understory trees
Guava. Psidium Tropical shrubs native to Mexico, Central and South America that yield white, yellow or pink fruit. Not to be confused with Pineapple Guava (Feijoa) Psidium guajava (apple guava) is one tasty variety. Also try lemon guava and strawberry guava.

VEGGIES (there’s no way to name them all – it’s fun to experiment to see what likes the soil under and around your fruit trees. Our favorites are those that overwinter and/or reseed themselves)
Artichokes. Plant away from tree roots, in baskets as the gophers love them.
Brassicas like broccoli, kale, collard greens.
Chard.
Dandelions. Leaves are great in salads and so good for us. Small birds like the seed heads.
Fava beans and other beans.
New Zealand spinach.

VINES
We often forget about vertical space in the garden, but it’s nice to increase your yield by growing edible vines up fruit trees, on walls and over arbors, fences and hedges.
Grapes. Note: the Permaculture Guild of Santa Barbara has a separate list of recommended table and wine grapes for our area. Contact lbuzzell@aol.com for details
Passion Fruit. A garden member says “mine is simply rampant, productive and trouble-free; gets little to no supplemental water.” The juice can be used to make a spectacular salad dressing (served at Los Arroyos on Coast Village Road in their tropical salad).

MISCELLANEOUS
Bamboo. Use clumping instead of running kinds to avoid it taking over your garden. Bamboo shoots are a delicacy in Asia.
Pepino melon.
Sacrificial plants. In permaculture designs we often plant trees, shrubs and other plants that are nitrogen-accumulators, “nurse” plants or fruit-providers for animals that might otherwise eat our crops. When they have performed their function, we “chop and drop” them around our fruit trees as a nutritious mulch.
Yucca. We’ve read that yucca yields edible fruit and flower buds. Anyone have more info on this?

BENEFICIAL ATTRACTORS AND NUTRIENT ACCUMULATORS
Ceanothus. Shrubs and ground covers that fix nitrogen in the soil.
Salvia, ornamental. These are treasures in the Mediterranean forest garden.
Tagetes lemmonii. Golden color is lovely in fall.

GROUND COVER
Easy-to-grow succulents can provide temporary ground cover for delicate roots. They can act as a living mulch until other plants take over that function. This crop is often free, as gardeners who have ground-cover sedums always have too many and are glad to share.
Pelargoniums and lantana are other easy, colorful ground cover that can be removed as needed.
__________________________________________________________________

#1 Home Permaculture book in the world for seven years!

Per PatternLiteracy.com, Toby Hemenway’s home site, Gaia’s Garden has been the best-selling permaculture book in the world for the last 7 years. The enlarged, updated 2nd edition is the winner of the 2011 Nautilus Gold Medal Award.

The first edition of Gaia’s Garden sparked the imagination of America’s home gardeners, introducing permaculture’s central message: Working with nature, not against her, results in more beautiful, abundant, and forgiving gardens. This extensively revised and expanded second edition broadens the reach and depth of the permaculture approach for urban and suburban growers.

Treat yourself and your land to this incredibly efficient way of gardening. Wisely use ALL the space available to you in a good way. Nature is the Master Gardener – follow her lead.

Read Full Post »

Community Gardens 


Not all Community Gardens are veggie oriented.  This one is in Somerville, Massachusetts.   

Providing beautiful surroundings is one of the many things that sets the VNA’s (Visiting Nurse Assn.) Assisted Living Community apart from other facilities. The Community Garden helps make our residents’ lives a little brighter each day.   

View the Garden design planting plan, by the talented Tim Houlihan who is a landscape architect. Tim has very generously donated all of his time and creativity in honor of his grandmother to make this garden a reality for our residents.   

Community Garden, Visiting Nurse Assn. Assisted Living

Community Garden, Visiting Nurse Assn. Assisted Living


Good Green Thinking! 


Per Sunday April 25, 2010 Edhat article:  Gunter Pauli suggests by emulating nature we can evolve from an economy based on scarcity to an economy based on abundance—the cascading, nutrient rich, Blue Economy. Founder of Zero Emissions Research Initiatives (ZERI) Global Network, Gunter Pauli pioneered the concept of waste being seen as a resource that with creative thinking, can be used to create multiple enterprises from singular ones, with benefits for the economy and the environment. Pauli is fond of saying that returns on investment from these kinds of business models far exceed those of companies like Microsoft!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: