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Posts Tagged ‘mycorrhiza’

At Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden, Santa Barbara CA, I believe the first bean, a fine Romano, was plucked April 27; a beauty it was!  Maria Heninger planted her beans early and we watched with green bean envy as they have grown their way up her trellis!  Those of us who planted in March are just about to have returns! 

Water deeply, specially as each plant needs.  That’s more frequently for short rooted beans, cucs and strawberries, thirsty lettuces.  Now that the ground is warm, lay down your mulch, a natural blanket that keeps light out, moisture in, soil cooler.  But don’t use cocoa shells, it can kill doggies.  Immediately after planting and watering your new little plant in, sprinkle on some Sluggo.  Tiny tender plants are irresistible!

Side dress/fertilize, especially if leaves are looking pale or your plant is puny or slowing down.  Blood meal for a quick fix, otherwise, compost, a little manure raked in, liquid kelp & fish mix.  Epsom salts for your peppers, once when they bloom and again ten days later. Go very gently with beans, tomatoes and strawberries.  These are not leaf crops, you want fruit!  Too much N (nitrogen), and you get a lot of leaf, little production.  If your planting bed was too rich or you over fertilized, bee bop on out to Island Seed & Feed and pick up some Seabird Guano (NOT Bat Guano!).  The Seabird Guano is high in phosphorus, promotes healthy root growth, greatly increases the number of flowers, increases the available phosphorus in the soil and enhances beneficial bacteria activity in the soil!  It is good to use generally just before your plants flower or you see the first flowers!  This inexpensive treatment is a wonder!  Imagine how many beans, strawberries….Yes! 

Now is the time to plant heat tolerant and slow bolting varieties of cilantro, and lettuces – Nevada, Sierra, Jericho, Slobolt, Black Seeded Simpson.  Bolting, a natural maturing phenomena – the center of the plant shoots up and forms flowers, is caused by accumulated light hours, warm temps, and water stress.  Another thing to find is varieties that are leaf tip burn resistant.  Might plant them under a bit of a canopy or in the shade of a larger plant?  As your big plants get up, clear the lowest leaves and tuck some lettuce or dandelion greens underneath?

If you left open space for successive planting, it’s time to fill those last spots!  Things are heating up and growth will be speedy this month!  Plant yet another round of any summer crops and year rounders you want!  Keep ‘em coming!   More eggplant, limas, melons, okra, peppers, pumpkins, beans, tomatoes, corn, New Zealand spinach, cucumbers, summer (fair warning, summer squash – zucchini, are prolific (maybe you don’t need another of these?) and winter squash!  Add more year-rounds, beets, carrots, chard, radish, turnips.  

See Quick Tips for Some Summer Plants!  Your Island Seed & Feed shopping list:  While you are getting your Seabird Guano, get some mycorrhiza fungi, Maxicrop – it’s amazing stuff, bone meal, and culinary dandelion seeds!  Oh, and some Sluggo!  The new containers labeled ‘organic’ have spinosad added to the pellets, otherwise BOTH are organic – meaning they aren’t made from chemicals, but a natural substance. Spinosad kills fruit flies, caterpillars, leafminers, thrips, sawflies, spider mites, fire ants, and leaf beetle larvae, while not killing beneficial organisms including ladybugs, green lacewings, minute pirate bugs, and predatory mites.  It would be worth it to me for killing the leafminers alone!  They are the ones that make the lines and brown/grey areas on your beet and chard leaves. 

Harvesting is not just for food!  Just like deadheading flowers, when you harvest, they keep coming!  Eat little zuchs flowers and all!  Pull beans and cucs continuously while they are young and tender.  No storing on the vine, or your plant will think it is done!  Continue to harvest your broc side shoots.  Once it goes to flower (they are edible – sprinkle them on your salad!), no more side shoots.

* Plant special flowers, herbs, or veggies for Mother’s Day gifts!  Friends getting married in June?!  Why not give them plants for their new garden together?!  How symbolic!  Plant a little extra all the time for ready gifts for any occasion!

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Planting by the Moon Dates!  Farmers’ Almanac  

It’s time to feed the plants you planted in March and April!  That’s a little manure or compost sprinkled around, raked in, or foliar feeding some compost tea laced with fish emulsion/kelp mix!  Yum.  Maxicrop works wonders!  Your strawberries will like fish/kelp every two weeks to keep producing lots of big juicy berries!  Well-rotted manure or compost are also good ways to fertilize your broccoli, especially after you cut the main head off and are wanting lots of those little side shoots for your salads!  Just before, or when your plants start flowering, give them some Seabird Guano to increase flowering and the number of flowers!  More flowers, more fruit!  

Any nursery will have the fish/kelp, manures, compost.  If you are using bag compost, look for the best that is plant tasty!  The best has worm castings, mycorrhiza fungi, bat guano, gypsum, kelp meal, oyster shell, lime & dolomite limes (pH adjusters).  

Compost tea is easy to make, just fill a container 1/3 full of compost, put that compost in a net type bag or cloth, and put it back in your container. Add water, let stand even only 24 hours, or 2 to 7 days, stirring every day.  This will give you a potent mix.  Dilute it 10:1 parts water:compost tea.  You can put your mix in a sprinkler can, preferably one that has a nozzle that swivels up, so you can foliar feed under the leaves as well as the top.  When you apply your tea, there’s no reason why you can’t pop in some fish/kelp mix as well!  

Dramm 5 liter Watering Can for Foliar Feeding

 

Peppers like sulfur!  Easy to do!  Buy some Epsom Salts at the grocery store, mix a tablespoon/watering can, foliar feed!  Foliar feeding is simply sprinkling leaves with your solutions.  Get one of those Dramm 5 liter long spouted watering cans that has a long spout and a turnable sprinkler head.  That long spout comes in handy, reaching well into your plant!   Turn the head so the water shoots up under the leaves then falls back on the tops!  The long arc of the handle gives lots of maneuvering ability!   Feed them once when they bloom and again ten days later.  The results, attributed to magnesium in the salts, are larger plants, more flowers, more fruit!   I use this mix on all my Solanaceaes:  eggplant, pepper, tomato, tomatillo, and roses!

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