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In honor of Wesak, the May Taurus/Scorpio Full Moon, of Love and Wisdom, the Buddha, I share this story with you for your contemplation….


It is said that people in Tibet seek healing from physical and emotional wounds in a unique way.
They sit downwind from flowers. It is a therapy that has been carried on for centuries, based not on superstition but on natural medicine. Sitting downwind from flowers, one can be dusted with the pollen from new blossoms, pollen that some say carries certain healing qualities.

Linda Ross Swanson tells the story of a 52-year-old Tibetan refugee named Tenzin who lived in Seattle. Diagnosed with lymphoma and unwilling to undergo the usual chemotherapy treatment because it brought back memories of having been tortured as a political prisoner in China, he was brought to a hospice. There he told workers of the Tibetan method of healing, and one of them agreed to help.

On a sunny afternoon the hospice worker picked up Tenzin and his wife, packed some provisions traditional to Tibetans—black tea, yak butter, salt, cups and cookies—and dropped the couple off at a nursery. They found a suitable spot, sat downwind from the flowers and, under the watchful eye of curious nursery employees, enjoyed their afternoon tea. They did the same the following week at another nursery.

The word got around, and soon nurseries all over Seattle were vying for Tenzin’s presence. They called him when new plants arrived, placed chairs to match the wind direction and provided the tea. Customers filled flats with flowers and put them carefully around the couple, and some began calling nurseries to ask how he was doing. Day after day throughout an entire summer Tenzin and his wife sat downwind from flowers around Seattle.

At the end of the summer, Tenzin went in for a follow-up CT scan. There was no trace of cancer. The doctor confessed he was astounded and could not explain the miraculous change. Tenzin had his own explanation: “I know why the cancer left. It can’t live in a body filled with love. When I began to feel all the compassion from the hospice team, from the nursery employees, from all the people who wanted to know about me, I began to change inside.”

I share this story not to promote folk medicine but because I believe love cures people—those who receive it and those who give it. Love is life’s healing agent. When searching for a way to heal—if not cancer, then at least a wounded heart—sit downwind from flowers. Allow people to touch you with their goodness and kindness. Allow them to be touched by yours. There is healing there.

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You have just read “Downwind from Flowers,” written by Dr. Michael Halleen and re-printed here with his permission.  It was published as Monday Moments on April 7, 2008. His book, You Are Rich, is a collection of sixty Monday Moments  and is available for sale at $12 each. Contact Dr. Halleen at mhalleen@att.net for more information.

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Planting by the Moon Dates!  Farmers’ Almanac  

It’s time to feed the plants you planted in March and April!  That’s a little manure or compost sprinkled around, raked in, or foliar feeding some compost tea laced with fish emulsion/kelp mix!  Yum.  Maxicrop works wonders!  Your strawberries will like fish/kelp every two weeks to keep producing lots of big juicy berries!  Well-rotted manure or compost are also good ways to fertilize your broccoli, especially after you cut the main head off and are wanting lots of those little side shoots for your salads!  Just before, or when your plants start flowering, give them some Seabird Guano to increase flowering and the number of flowers!  More flowers, more fruit!  

Any nursery will have the fish/kelp, manures, compost.  If you are using bag compost, look for the best that is plant tasty!  The best has worm castings, mycorrhiza fungi, bat guano, gypsum, kelp meal, oyster shell, lime & dolomite limes (pH adjusters).  

Compost tea is easy to make, just fill a container 1/3 full of compost, put that compost in a net type bag or cloth, and put it back in your container. Add water, let stand even only 24 hours, or 2 to 7 days, stirring every day.  This will give you a potent mix.  Dilute it 10:1 parts water:compost tea.  You can put your mix in a sprinkler can, preferably one that has a nozzle that swivels up, so you can foliar feed under the leaves as well as the top.  When you apply your tea, there’s no reason why you can’t pop in some fish/kelp mix as well!  

Dramm 5 liter Watering Can for Foliar Feeding

 

Peppers like sulfur!  Easy to do!  Buy some Epsom Salts at the grocery store, mix a tablespoon/watering can, foliar feed!  Foliar feeding is simply sprinkling leaves with your solutions.  Get one of those Dramm 5 liter long spouted watering cans that has a long spout and a turnable sprinkler head.  That long spout comes in handy, reaching well into your plant!   Turn the head so the water shoots up under the leaves then falls back on the tops!  The long arc of the handle gives lots of maneuvering ability!   Feed them once when they bloom and again ten days later.  The results, attributed to magnesium in the salts, are larger plants, more flowers, more fruit!   I use this mix on all my Solanaceaes:  eggplant, pepper, tomato, tomatillo, and roses!

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