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Powdery Mildew on Peas

Select powdery mildew resistant or tolerant varieties!

Disease Resistant Varieties Right from the Beginning!

  • Green beans:  Provider – (Green/Bush): Bean Mosaic Virus Race 15, Common Bean Mosaic, Downy Mildew, Powdery Mildew. Contender – (Stringless Green/Bush): tolerates heat and powdery mildew, resistant to common bean mosaic virus.
  • Cucumber: Diva, Cumlaude, Media F1. Larry Hodgson lists no less than 71 PM resistant varieties! One of the old standards, Marketmore 76 and 97 are on the list. He doesn’t specify what kind of cucumbers they are, but you can have a ton of fun looking some of them up! I see several familiar names.
  • Muskmelon:  Ambrosia F1 – Downy & Powdery Mildew. Primo (western type) – Tolerance to Powdery Mildew 1 & 2, and Sulphur. There are many melon possibilities. Take a little time looking them up.
  • Pea:
    • Ambassador – Resistant to powdery mildew, entation virus and fusarium wilt
    • Cavalier – Good resistance to powdery mildew.
    • Greenshaft – Resistant to downy mildew and fusarium wilt
    • Rondo – Resistant to fusarium wilt
    • Downy Mildew resistant peas:  Kelevdon Wonder, Oasis, Twinkle, Avola, Hurst Greenshaft, Ambassador, Cavalier and Peawee.
  • Pumpkin:  Per SFGate – ‘Large varieties include “Alladin” and “Gladiator.” Try “Hobbit” and “Scarecrow,” for medium-sized pumpkins. Small, mildew resistant varieties include “Pure Gold” and “Touch of Autumn.” ‘ In 2015 the Ashland Garden Club posted this great list Powdery Mildew-resistant Pumpkin & Squash Varieties compiled by the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension.
  • Winter Squash:  almost all varieties
  • Yellow Summer Squash: Success, Sunray, Sunglo
  • Zucchini: Ambassador, Wildcat

Clearly there are many more plants and many more varieties than covered by this sampling. Things change each year as some supplies dwindle, new strong varieties are presented! Enjoy a scan around the net for the latest info!

Healthy Practices Make a Difference!

  • Plant in full sun!
  • Plant so leaves of one plant don’t touch another and spread the spores.
  • Have plenty of airflow. If the plant is too dense in its interior, thin it.
  • Remove any debris or dead leaves breeding habitat.
  • Remove and don’t compost infected leaves. If you don’t remove them, you reinfect your plant each time you water.
  • Wash tools and your hands before you go from one plant to the next.
  • Water in the AM, at ground level.  No overhead watering.

Prevention is the key word!

BEFORE you have mildew, while your plants are still babies, here is a natural homemade remedy. Drench the leaves with a baking soda/milk mix.  Tablespoon Soda, ¼ cup nonfat milk powder, 1 regular aspirin crushed, 1/2 teaspoon liquid dish detergent in a watering can. Baking Soda alkalizes your plant, inhibits germination of the spores. Milk and Aspirin boost your plant’s immune system. Please also see IPM Powdery Mildew on Vegetables including tomatoes!

Drench weekly with your mix before the sun gets on the leaves and dries it. You want to give the solution time to be absorbed. Be sure to apply to both tops and bottoms of leaves and the stems. See Keeping Your Veggie Garden Happy – Foliar Plant Care! This is excellent for Roses too!

Roguing. When a bacterial or viral infection is suspected, if you think it’s too late, experience tells you that you aren’t going to be able to get rid of the mildew, sadly, do the one cut prune. Rogues are removed from the fields to preserve the quality of the crop being grown. Remove that plant asap so it doesn’t spread mildew to uninfected plants – yours or your neighbors’. Trash it, don’t compost it.  Mildew is windborne, so the more mildew, the more is spread.

Mildew is a temperature related disease – warm temperatures between 70 and 80F. And when plants are older in the season they are more likely to get it. They have been working hard producing and no longer have their youthful vitality, spent. I see that as a natural part of their life, a signal to thank them and let them go.

Mildew is usually not fatal, but it can bring your plant to a standstill. No production, suffering plant. Sometimes a change of weather will revive it. A lot depends on the strength of your plant. Choose the most resistant varieties, feed them the best and enough. But if no immediate recovery, let yourself grieve, you had high hopes. Then get on with it, get a better variety, start over. Be a good plant keeper. Pay attention to it, keep it watered per its needs.

Best of luck. Thank you for caring. Plants are dear living beings.

Updated 5.16.20


Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic! Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara’s community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are often in a fog belt/marine layer most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is.

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Rainy Day Harvesting!

Anticipate! 

Fertilize before a rain so the fertilizer will soak in.
Take the cover off your compost to let it get wet.
Tie or stake plants that may topple from wind or weight.
Set up to harvest rainwater for later use! 
Make raised beds, mounds, to help with drainage issues.
Mulch to keep soil from splashing up on your plants, keeping your harvest clean, holding water in place to soak in, and keep soil from eroding.
Make ‘permanent’ pathways with boards, stepping stones, straw bedding, so you won’t be compacting your planting area soil when it is wet or dry!
Plant for air circulation so foliage dries quickly.  Plants too closely spaced, make a warmer micro environment, tend to get mildew easier.
Choose mildew resistant plants! 
Drench your young plants with a mix of a heaping tablespoon of baking soda, a 1/4 cup of nonfat (so it won’t rot and stink) powdered milk in a large watering can of water for mildew prevention and abatement.  It works for certain other diseases as well!
Water less frequently and at ground level, not overhead.

During a rainy period….

If you didn’t before, get out there in your rain gear and add some manure or fertilizer!  Great excuse to play in the rain!
Check frequently to see how your plants are doing.  Secure any tall plants, trellises that need it.
If a plant is too low and in standing water, raise it.  Put your shovel deep under it, put some filler soil underneath the shovel!  
Add more mulch if it has shifted or wasn’t quite deep enough to keep mud spatter from your plants.
Be sure your wormbox worms are not doing the backstroke!
Rebuild any drainage channel that has weakened, clear if clogged.
Make sure all your rain harvest system is working well.  Kudos to you for harvesting!
Practice arm-chair gardening!  Read garden books, magazines, browse web sites, buy some seeds from mail-order catalogs, design your new garden layout!
Get some seeds, soilless potting mix, gather containers with, or make, drainage holes.  Start some seeds!
If the rain is prolonged, uh, do an aphid, snail and slug check as frequently as you can.  Sluggo works on snails  and slugs even when it is wet.  Hard to believe, but, yes, it does.
If the rain is prolonged, do harvest your fresh and crunchy produce!  Lettuces will flourish!  Check on fast maturing broccoli and cauliflower heads to cut at peak maturity!  Gather your luscious strawberries.  Keep your peas picked to keep them coming!

After the rain!  YES! 

Do some thinning for air circulation as makes sense.  Often there is a growth spurt, and you can see where thinning is needed.
Repair areas where soil has washed away exposing roots.  Put some mulch on.
It’s often warmer after a rain, and it is the warmth that mildew loves!   Drench mildew susceptible plants with your mildew mix immediately, early in the day so your plants can dry.  If you prune mildewed areas off, remove those prunings, wash your hands and pruners before you go on to other plants.
Do what you do about snails and slugs.  Keep checking for aphids – blast them away with water or remove infested leaves.
There is often more gopher activity after rain has softened the soil, so be ready! 
In later days, after the rain, harvest first, water second!  That’s the rule to keep from spreading diseases spread by moisture.

Enjoy the superlative rapid growth of your very happy plants!

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