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Posts Tagged ‘long’

Prolific Green Rat's Tail Radish!

Short podded Rat’s Tail or Edible Podded Radish, Raphanus sativus caudatus

I want to get you excited about another unusual heirloom veggie you might like to try! Rat’s Tail are indigenous to Southern portions of Asia. Seed ordering time is coming right up! These you need to order now for spring planting because they are heat lovers, though as a Brassica, they don’t mind SoCal winters either! It seeds in its first year, so you can save your own seeds for next year’s plantings right away! If you plan to save seeds, do not let ‘Rat’s Tail’ cross-pollinate, hybridize, with conventional radish varieties. You can imagine the problems, LOL! A very confused plant!

Purple Dragon’s Tail is prolific too! You can see there is little foliage, a lot of pods!

Purple Dragon's Tail is prolific too! You can see there is little foliage, a lot of pods!

The pods are said to have the same ‘sizzling bite and crispness as traditional bulb radishes!’ In fact, all radish pods are edible, but these are bred specifically for their high flavor and to produce prodigious amounts of them!

Fat and Tasty Rat's Tail Radish, Green Pods!Dragon's Tail Purple Radish Pods!

There are short Rat’s Tails; they also come in longs! Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds offers Singara Rat’s Tail Radish, a delicacy in India. They report the pods grew over 14 inches in length at their Missouri trial gardens this year! Perfect for beginner or market gardeners, very heat tolerant and an extremely generous producer.

Rat’s Tails are an unruly plant! Leave plenty of room for their full personality to develop! Some say they definitely need some sort of support, but it looks to me like you can try and hope, but….

Full Sun. Planting is just like planting your regular radishes only you don’t harvest the little bulbs. You give it a lot of space! 1/2 to 1″ deep, thin to 18″ apart, and let it grow out to seed pods! You don’t just get one radish per plant, then replant, but you do have to wait. Once it starts podding, the harvest lasts about 4 to 6 weeks in the heat of summer. It grows up to 5′ tall and 2′ wide. Plant regular little bulb radishes for happiness supply before the Tails arrive!

Rat’s Tails need regular water, at least 1 inch per week, especially while the pods are forming. In summer, mulch is good to keep the soil moist and cut back on weeds. Living mulch is a great choice! In winter remove mulch and let the soil get as warm as it can. A feeding 30 to 40 days in is good so they grow fast and full. If they don’t get enough water or food, the pods may be smaller, hotter, fibrous.

Like other radishes, they are fast to produce! It’s a quick 45 – 50 days to harvest! Snap a pod in half to see how crisp it is. Plant every 2 – 3 weeks. Rat’s Tail pods form faster in heat and you’ll need to harvest young pods regularly or the plants will stop setting flowers. And, like okra, large pods get tough in a minute! If you need a less harvest time intensive plant this year, Rat’s Tail may not be the choice for you. Store only a couple days at most.

Aphids may jump on your plant, but you know where the hose is! Blow ’em away! Or grab the insecticidal soap.

Eat raw, that means right off the plant! Put them in Salads, stir-fries, stews. Eat pickled, with a dip! The flowers are pretty sprinkled on salads. Cooking knocks back the heat, but they are still crunchy.

White, yellow, pink and purple flowers attract all sorts of butterflies and bees and the plants add lovely texture to your garden! Plant a patch among your ornamentals!


The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara’s community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are often in a fog belt/marine layer most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic!

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Other Community Gardens   

Full Circle Farm, Sunnyvale CA

 

Some community gardens are larger and have different purposes!  Full Circle Farm is 11 acres!  It is an organic educational farm funded by nonprofit Sustainable Community Gardens. One of their goals is to put ‘fresh food in Santa Clara Unified School District cafeterias.’   Their ‘About Us’ page says:  Programs being developed include a science and nutrition elective for 6-8th graders, a farm-based apprenticeship program for teenagers, a mentoring program where at-risk teens lead elementary youth in garden and nutrition workshops, and a variety of school field trip programs.    

As a team, young people grow their own food, and develop critical life skills of communication, teamwork, leadership, decision-making, and problem-solving through practical, hands-on agricultural and entrepreneurial experiences.  If you will be up that way over the summer, here’s where to visit:  1055 Dunford Way, Sunnyvale, CA 94087
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Good Green Thinking! 

From Mother Earth News:  Grow $700 of Food in 100 Square Feet!  4 great tips from Rosalind Creasy & Cathy Wilkinson Barash:    

  1. Choose indeterminate tomatoes. They keep growing and producing fruit until a killing frost. (Determinate varieties save space but ripen all at once.) 
  2. In spring, plant cool-season vegetables, including lettuce, mesclun and stir-fry green mixes, arugula, scallions, spinach and radishes. They are ready to harvest in a short time, and they act as space holders until the warm-season veggies fill in. 
  3. Grow up. Peas, small melons, squash, cucumbers and pole beans have a small footprint when grown vertically. Plus, they yield more over a longer time than bush types.   
  4. Plants such as broccoli, eggplant, peppers, chard and kale are worth the space they take for a long season. As long as you keep harvesting, they will keep producing until frost   

The expanded second edition of Rosalind Creasy’s landmark book, Edible Landscaping, will be released in Spring 2010.

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