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Please put these good events on your calendar and share rides!   

Louise Lowry Davis Center Landscape Gets a Facelift!   1232 De La Vina Street (at Victoria)
UCCE Master Gardeners of Santa Barbara County and the Santa Barbara Parks and Recreation Department will be conducting a series of hands on demonstrations that show how to convert the Center’s lawn and other planted areas into water-wise planted beds!  Sustainability is key.  Email our Master Gardener Daphne Page, Plot 32, if you want to assist or have questions!

Sat, Nov 6, 2010, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Lawn and Plant Removal, Soil Preparation and Irrigation Basics

Sat, Nov 13, 2010, 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Foundation Plants in Design; Planting Trees and Large Shrubs

Sat, Nov 13, 2010, 10:30 AM –  12:00 PM
Shrubs, Accents and Groundcover in DesignPlanting These Secondary and Tertiary Plants


Gaia Festival 2010, November 13-14, 2010  HEAL – LOVE – CELEBRATE MOTHER EARTH
Music / Healers / Art / Film / Meditation / Body Movement / Drumming / Ceremony / Community

The line up this year is incredible – Lisa Beck and Budhi Harlow of Panzumo, Santa Barbara’s most energetic West African drum and dance group; Gaia Fest fave and beloved Board Member Karen Tate; Stephen Gerringer of The Joseph Campbell Foundation, who tore up the stage in 2008! Check out our website for the full lineup and schedule.

Please continue to send out your powerful prayers for our beloved Mother Earth.  Drum for Her, sing for Her, and do what you can to help create a sustainable future.

Gaia Festival sponsors a charity or two each year and for 2010 80% of raffle ticket sales and a percentage of the ticket sales will go to Quail Springs Learning Oasis and Permaculture Farm to help them rebuild and recover after experiencing the devastating flash flood.  Sponsor someone to take their Permaculture Design Certification Course!


Nov 17 from 7 pm – 8:45 pm

Free class!  Patio Permaculture: Growing Food on your Balcony, Porch or Patio
South Coast Watershed Resource Center
Arroyo Burro/Hendry’s Beach, 2981 Cliff Drive 


At the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden!  
 

Santa Barbara Botanic Garden Holiday MarketPlace 2010!


2011 Master Gardener Class!
  Applications are now being taken!  Have you, or someone you know wanted to become a Master Gardener?!!  Go to http://cesantabarbara.ucdavis.ecu/MasterGardener for info about the Program, and fill out your application.  Applications must be postmarked or received by e-mail by January 14th.   

There will be an Open House for all interested parties on January 12th, details to come
Interviews will be held the week of January 17th
Classes begin February 9th from 1-4 PM

It’s an awesome program!  Daphne Page, Plot 32, and myself, are both Master Gardeners.  Ask us any questions you have about the program, and, of course, garden questions.  If we don’t know the answer, we will try to find out for you!  The Master Gardener text/reference is the California Master Gardener Handbook, an invaluable reference whether you are a Master Gardener or not!  Put it right alongside your Western Sunset Garden Book & Pat Welsh’s Southern California Gardening!  Be prepared to make special new friends, step into a dedicated community, share truly inspiring projects.

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Fat Pumpkins & Fun Hay Rides, Lane Farms, Goleta CA

 Happy Halloween! 

  • Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites!
  • Pumpkin flowers are edible.
  • Pumpkins are 90% water. 
  • Pumpkins are used for feed for animals.
  • Pumpkin seeds can be roasted as a snack.
  • Native Americans used pumpkin seeds for food and medicine.
  • In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  • The name ‘pumpkin’ originated from ‘pepon,’ the Greek word for ‘large melon.’
  • Pumpkins contain potassium and Vitamin A.
  • As of Oct 2009, the largest pumpkin ever grown weighted 1,725 pounds!
     

DollarWise – From Grocery to Garden!

Adapted from Pat Veretto’s article…. 

Beans, Garlic, Tomatoes and more

Beans being beans, you can plant the ones that come from the grocery store. Eat half the beans, plant the rest! Beans are seeds and seeds grow.  So do whole peas, raw peanuts, popcorn, wheat berries, raw untreated spice seed (celery, anise, sesame, etc.)… well, you get the idea. Vegetables like peppers, tomatoes and fruits like watermelon, have seeds in them that will grow. Eat the food, then plant the seeds of the food you like!  

Note: Green beans of any kind, or peas in the pod bought at the produce counter, will not grow. They’re “green” – immature seed.  

If you don’t know the general planting rules for a vegetable, read seed packet at the nursery, or check online.  Easy.  

  In addition to seeds, the grocery store is a source of tubers like potatoes, yams and fresh ginger, sprouting plants like garlic and onions, and plants you can sometimes regrow, like celery, cabbage and carrots (carrot tops only, for edible greens – you won’t get another carrot).  

If you’d like to save tomato seeds to plant, first remember that tomatoes from the grocery are hybrids, unless you get heirlooms. Hybrids  mean the plant and tomato you get may not be what you expect (but it will be a tomato!). Scoop the seeds from a cut tomato and save with the liquid surrounding them, or mash a whole tomato and let it set at room temperature two or three days, then rinse gently and dry for storage, or plant them right away.  

Peppers, cucumbers, squash, pumpkin, and eggplant should be allowed to mature before using the seed, as the seed matures along with the vegetable. Planting these can be an adventure, as it’s not possible to know with what or if they’ve been cross pollinated, but try it anyway.  

Garlic will grow happily in a container on your windowsill or in the ground. Buy fresh garlic and use the largest cloves to plant. Put the unpeeled clove, pointed side up, in light soil with the tip just showing. Keep the soil damp and in a few days you should see a green shoot. You can eat this top, but if you let it grow, it will eventually turn brown and dry up. That means the garlic is “done” – you can dig it up and you should have a whole bulb of garlic, from which you can choose the largest clove and start the process again. If you plant garlic outside, you can leave it over winter for a spring harvest, or plant in the spring for a late summer or early autumn harvest.  

Root Crops from the Produce Department

Did you ever sort through one of those tubs of “onion sets” looking for ones that looked alive? Then you know what a bonus buying onions that are already growing can be! Green onions, the kind packaged or rubber banded and ready to eat, can be put back in the ground and grown to full size onions. Look for onions that have a round bulb because flat or thin bulbs may be another type of onion that never grows any larger, like a winter or spring onion. Set the onions upright in two or three inches of water for a couple of hours before planting, then keep the soil damp until the roots have been reestablished. 

  Most full sized onions will regrow if you cut the root end off along with an inch or so of onion. Plant the root in good ground, and keep it watered. It will begin to sprout within a few days and you’ll have green onion shoots, and sometimes a new onion bulb.  

About the only difference between “seed potatoes” and the eating kind of potatoes from the grocery store is the size – government specifications are between 1 ½ and 3 ¼ inches diameter. Other than that, the rules are that they can’t be affected by nematode injury, freezing or various rots, soil or other damages… I truly hope that the potatoes we buy to eat are of such high quality.  

Some potatoes are treated to keep them from sprouting – you’ll want the ones that sprout. Look out for the radiation symbol on the package. Irradiated potatoes are dead – they won’t grow.  

Most sprouting potatoes can be cut to get more than one plant. Just be sure to keep enough of the potato flesh to nurture the sprout until it can develop roots. Plant potatoes when the weather is still cool, barely below ground in light, sandy or straw filled soil.  

  Is it cost effective to buy groceries to garden with? Well, you’ll usually get enough seed from one squash to plant 15 to 20 hills. One potato is enough for three to four plants each of which should produce at least a meal’s worth in a poor season. And remember the “seed quality” beans? How much does it cost for a whole pound of beans?  Buy local – farmers market, roadside stands – for seeds adapted to our area.  Buy organic for untreated seeds!  Once you grow your own, harvest the seed of your best plants, specifically adapted to your very own garden! 

Creative Home & Garden ideas says ‘If you buy some foods, such as horseradish, with the tops (or at least part of the top still attached), you can cut off the top, plant it in the ground, and it will reproduce another horseradish root just like the one you bought. The next year it will divide, and soon from only one top you will have an entire patch of horseradish.

And that’s a bargain. When was the last time you bought something, ate it, and still had 200 of them left over?

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