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Annual Picnic at Community Garden Long Beach CA - 310 Plots!

Annual Picnic at Long Beach CA Community Garden!

Joanne is truly a Garden Heroine! She is not technically a Master Gardener but has qualifications that far exceed their requirements. She studied with Charlie Nordozzie of Southern California Garden Trials for National Gardening Magazine fame. Charlie is a nationally recognized garden writer, speaker, and radio and television personality. She also studied with professor Jacob Mittleider of the Mittleider Garden Group (worldwide method of gardening), and through good old fashioned trial and error. And she’s still learning!

For 35 years she has guided and gardened at Long Beach Community Garden. She is the second oldest gardener there now. There are 303 (20 X 30 ft – 600 sq ft) garden plots there, at $130/yr. With their year round mild/hot but not too hot weather, you can easily feed your family organic food every day of the year! She says: Our gardens have been in existence since 1976. We have 9 acres of growing space which also includes a one acre fruit orchard! 

We have new members all of the time. I try to take members month by month with what to do to be successful. Many leave because they get discouraged. [A 20 x 30 plot can be a challenge for a beginner!]

Joanne, and her dear friend Fran, just gave a class at the garden with lots of hints. Here are some she gives to us this October 2019…

  1. To prevent aphids on your cole crops [that’s fall/winter plants like Brassicas  Broccoli, Cauliflower, Kale, Cabbage, Brussels Sprouts, Collard Greens], after planting, wrap some paper plates, front and back, aluminum foil, shiny side up. Place under your plants. The reflection confuses all bugs and they leave. You can actually buy ‘SILVER MULCH‘ at Johnny’s Select Seeds. I have it but paper plates are much cheaper. Commercial growers use this.
  2. I recommend that everyone spray their cole crops with BT, Bacillus thuringiensis,  worm killer [you can get at your nursery] before they plant them. While still in seed bed or six pack. This year Fran and I are giving our planting beds soil a single spray BT before planting. Just to see if it helps.
  3. Before planting, wrap something like a single piece of newspaper round stem of each plant up to first leaves and down to where stem enters root ball. Then plant, making sure hole deep enough so that part of stem and newspaper underground and part above soil. This will make it impossible for cutworms to cut your plant’s stem leaving you with nothing.
  4.  This past Spring/Summer we were plagued with CMV, Cucumber Mosaic Virus, mostly on squash. [Yes, other plants get it too.] Well we both know if left, and not pulled out, it will infect the soil with no cure. We advised everyone to remove infected plants. Then digging down 12 inches, remove soil and bag and throw in trash. Need to do at least a circle of removal at 12 inches and then pray it works.

A word on BT, Bacillus thuringiensis. One reader says ‘It’s true that BT, Bacillus thuringiensis, is approved for certified organic agricultural use but what it does is kill all butterfly/moth caterpillars. When I was an organic CSA farmer, I bought some one year but didn’t have the heart to apply it. Given the plunging populations of insects these days, we must give extra consideration to what we kill.’ Alternatives are being researched, but the main ones lead straight to GMOs – genetically modifying our plants.

10.5.19  Joanne reports, ‘Fran and I gave a class. Have known her for 36 years. She is now sharing my garden plot as I was caring for my beloved husband who was dying of cancer. I am elderly now. Will be 90 in March but still have all my faculties. Am still strong but grieving over my loss of Jack, my husband.’

Joanne wrote this while laying in a Hospital bed in a Rehab Hospital! Was transferred after stay at Memorial Hospital. I fell, suddenly, with no aura, no loss of consciousness – am injured but no fractures but bruises and sporting a whopper black eye. Went to Emergency and home. Thirty Six hours later, same thing happened. This time I picked myself up and called paramedics. No diagnosis yet but could use a lot of prayers.
💗❤️♥️.

Joanne Rice

Get connected! She says: Check our Facebook page where I post regularly). Look for Long Beach Community Garden. It shows a picture with a wheelbarrow, Lady Bug and LBCG on the side. [Joanne’s hubby Jack was an art teacher and painted that wheelbarrow!] You can access but not post. You may ask to post.

Website! http://lbcg.org/ A little more about the garden: Our 303 plots go quickly for only $130 per year! Plots are approximately 20′ X 30′ (600 sq ft) with water access points shared by four plots. Gardening is required year-round in all plots. Every member shares 10% of their crop with the FoodBank every day, feeding 100s of people. Membership fees cover water, manure for tilth, mulch for paths and disposal of garden waste and trash. The garden also owns an orchard on site which is managed by a committee, and its fruit is shared with all members. They have an annual Garden Party, work parties, and naturally, board meetings!

Besides Joanne’s garden qualifications, she has been Head Nurse, Director of Health Care, Campus Nurse at a college, hospitals and doctors’ offices in CA, PA TN and FL! With all her technical knowledge and that big heart, no wonder she is so good with plants too!

We are so grateful for Joanne’s enormous collection of wisdom gathered over so many years, and her stupendous efforts to share as much as she can, even now from that hospital bed! Kudos, Joanne! 

If any of you live in or are visiting Long Beach, see this fine garden! This is the 908 Show – LB Community Garden vid! It’s an awesome garden. That’s Joanne! Yep she’s an elder now and she ain’t quitting!

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See the entire October 2019 Newsletter!

Check out wonderful September 2019 images at Santa Barbara’s Rancheria Community Garden! See how much the Magical GREAT PUMPKIN weighs, fall birds, remarkable veggies, tiny seedlings, Leaffooted bug, a brand new Monarch!

The Green Bean Connection newsletter started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is.

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic! Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

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Yummerlicous basket of summer veggies grown near Mahanandi, a peaceful temple town in India.  Indira and her Husband Vijay share the traditional recipes of their families.  Brinjals, btw, are eggplants!

Each of your plants has special harvest needs and techniques to get continuing excellent returns! 

  • Be gentle in closely planted areas.  Leaf damage opens your plant to diseases and pests.  Breaking off new tender shoots stops that point of growth.
  • Harvest when your plants are dry, before you water, to reduce disease spread.

Beets  Pull when they are small and tender.  Steam the leaves too.

Broccoli  Though thought of as a winter crop, All Season brocs are perkin’ right along, prolific with side shoots!  Keep them picked to keep them coming.  Get them to the fridge ASAP because they wilt fast.

Cantaloupe is ready when it ‘slips’ from the plant – no pulling, it just comes off in your hand.

Corn is ripe when the silks turn crispy brown, and the juice is white when you pierce a kernel with your finger  nail.  Corn pretty much comes in all at once.  Get ready to feast, invite friends!  Corn turns starchy immediately, so get it to the fridge, or into that boiling water ASAP!  Cut the kernels off the cob to sprinkle over salads, freeze for winter stews.

Carrots  Poke around with your finger to see if the shoulder, the top of the carrot, is the size you want.  Loosen the soil with a spade fork if necessary, pull, rinse, eat!  I mean take them home to share with your family!  If they are hairy and forked, your soil was too rich.  If the shoulders are green, they needed to have been covered with soil.

Cucumbers!  Harvest at will.  Your choice, but big ones can be seedy.  And if you wait too long, the plant thinks it’s done and stops producing.  Harvesting smaller is better.  Keep your cucs well watered – they make a watery fruit.  Pickle some!  Grow dill beside them to be ready for pickling.

Eggplant, Aubergine.  Shiny.  When they are shiny and they don’t spring back when you press them.  The more you clip, the more you get.  Another no-store-on-the-plant!

Green Beans  Or any kind of bean!  Pick, pick, pick, carefully so as not to damage your plant, to keep them coming!  Pick when the leaves are dry, so you don’t spread diseases, and before the pods get bumpy.

Lettuces  Crisp summer lettuce salads hit the spot!  Pick the leaves last, just before you head for the fridge.  Keep taking the lower leaves.  If your plant starts to bolt (grow upward), take the whole plant right away unless you want it to seed for you, otherwise, it’s compost.

Peppers!   When they are big and they’ve got that great pepper shape!  Peppers have a specific number they reach and they won’t make any more until you pick some!

Radish  Keep them well watered for fast growth, pull before they split.  They are usually a bit hotter in summer.

Summer Squash (zucchini, crookneck, etc.)  Cut them off at your preference, but when it’s hot, keep a watch under those leaves!  Giant squash sap the strength from your plant and keep younger fruit from developing.  Harvest small for salad slices.  When you find a giant hiding, use it for stuffing and baking.  If you are getting too many, pick the blossoms off to slow them down; eat the blossoms!

See ALL about SQUASH at On The Green Farms! 

Tomatoes!  Red on the vine, before the bugs, birds or mice get them.

Watermelon  When the tendrils start to dry and the bottom of the melon turns creamy color.  If it makes a dull sound when you thump it, it’s overripe.

SEEDS!  Seeds are another kind of harvest!  Let your best plants flower and seed.  Collect those seeds for planting next year!  But not the seeds of hybrids or corn unless your corn in no way can hybridize with anyone else’s corn!

Preserve!  If you have a great abundance, start preserving!  Dry, freeze, can!

Share!  Have extra tomatoes, beans, cukes, zuchs, and you don’t have time or inclination to preserve?!  Share your abundance! Here’s how!

  • Give to Pilgrim Terrace residents!  Take your veggies to the office 8 AM to 5 PM (Modoc/Portesuello).  They watch the garden for us, so it’s good payback!  The elders really appreciate fresh veggies and herbs!
  • Santa Barbara County’s Foodbank  Drop off M-F 7 AM – 3:30 PM at  4554 Hollister Av.
  • Share at weekend Neighborhood Food Exchanges!  Dates and locations  

Thanks for your generosity when so many really need your kindness.   Just a quick stop among your errands….

Organic garden-fresh produce can’t be beat!  Enjoy every life-giving luscious bite!

Next week:  August in Your Garden!

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