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Posts Tagged ‘bite’

Prolific Green Rat's Tail Radish!

Short podded Rat’s Tail or Edible Podded Radish, Raphanus sativus caudatus

I want to get you excited about another unusual heirloom veggie you might like to try! Rat’s Tail are indigenous to Southern portions of Asia. Seed ordering time is coming right up! These you need to order now for spring planting because they are heat lovers, though as a Brassica, they don’t mind SoCal winters either! It seeds in its first year, so you can save your own seeds for next year’s plantings right away! If you plan to save seeds, do not let ‘Rat’s Tail’ cross-pollinate, hybridize, with conventional radish varieties. You can imagine the problems, LOL! A very confused plant!

Purple Dragon’s Tail is prolific too! You can see there is little foliage, a lot of pods!

Purple Dragon's Tail is prolific too! You can see there is little foliage, a lot of pods!

The pods are said to have the same ‘sizzling bite and crispness as traditional bulb radishes!’ In fact, all radish pods are edible, but these are bred specifically for their high flavor and to produce prodigious amounts of them!

Fat and Tasty Rat's Tail Radish, Green Pods!Dragon's Tail Purple Radish Pods!

There are short Rat’s Tails; they also come in longs! Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds offers Singara Rat’s Tail Radish, a delicacy in India. They report the pods grew over 14 inches in length at their Missouri trial gardens this year! Perfect for beginner or market gardeners, very heat tolerant and an extremely generous producer.

Rat’s Tails are an unruly plant! Leave plenty of room for their full personality to develop! Some say they definitely need some sort of support, but it looks to me like you can try and hope, but….

Full Sun. Planting is just like planting your regular radishes only you don’t harvest the little bulbs. You give it a lot of space! 1/2 to 1″ deep, thin to 18″ apart, and let it grow out to seed pods! You don’t just get one radish per plant, then replant, but you do have to wait. Once it starts podding, the harvest lasts about 4 to 6 weeks in the heat of summer. It grows up to 5′ tall and 2′ wide. Plant regular little bulb radishes for happiness supply before the Tails arrive!

Rat’s Tails need regular water, at least 1 inch per week, especially while the pods are forming. In summer, mulch is good to keep the soil moist and cut back on weeds. Living mulch is a great choice! In winter remove mulch and let the soil get as warm as it can. A feeding 30 to 40 days in is good so they grow fast and full. If they don’t get enough water or food, the pods may be smaller, hotter, fibrous.

Like other radishes, they are fast to produce! It’s a quick 45 – 50 days to harvest! Snap a pod in half to see how crisp it is. Plant every 2 – 3 weeks. Rat’s Tail pods form faster in heat and you’ll need to harvest young pods regularly or the plants will stop setting flowers. And, like okra, large pods get tough in a minute! If you need a less harvest time intensive plant this year, Rat’s Tail may not be the choice for you. Store only a couple days at most.

Aphids may jump on your plant, but you know where the hose is! Blow ’em away! Or grab the insecticidal soap.

Eat raw, that means right off the plant! Put them in Salads, stir-fries, stews. Eat pickled, with a dip! The flowers are pretty sprinkled on salads. Cooking knocks back the heat, but they are still crunchy.

White, yellow, pink and purple flowers attract all sorts of butterflies and bees and the plants add lovely texture to your garden! Plant a patch among your ornamentals!


The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara’s community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are often in a fog belt/marine layer most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic!

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Fat Pumpkins & Fun Hay Rides, Lane Farms, Goleta CA

 Happy Halloween! 

  • Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites!
  • Pumpkin flowers are edible.
  • Pumpkins are 90% water. 
  • Pumpkins are used for feed for animals.
  • Pumpkin seeds can be roasted as a snack.
  • Native Americans used pumpkin seeds for food and medicine.
  • In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  • The name ‘pumpkin’ originated from ‘pepon,’ the Greek word for ‘large melon.’
  • Pumpkins contain potassium and Vitamin A.
  • As of Oct 2009, the largest pumpkin ever grown weighted 1,725 pounds!
     

DollarWise – From Grocery to Garden!

Adapted from Pat Veretto’s article…. 

Beans, Garlic, Tomatoes and more

Beans being beans, you can plant the ones that come from the grocery store. Eat half the beans, plant the rest! Beans are seeds and seeds grow.  So do whole peas, raw peanuts, popcorn, wheat berries, raw untreated spice seed (celery, anise, sesame, etc.)… well, you get the idea. Vegetables like peppers, tomatoes and fruits like watermelon, have seeds in them that will grow. Eat the food, then plant the seeds of the food you like!  

Note: Green beans of any kind, or peas in the pod bought at the produce counter, will not grow. They’re “green” – immature seed.  

If you don’t know the general planting rules for a vegetable, read seed packet at the nursery, or check online.  Easy.  

  In addition to seeds, the grocery store is a source of tubers like potatoes, yams and fresh ginger, sprouting plants like garlic and onions, and plants you can sometimes regrow, like celery, cabbage and carrots (carrot tops only, for edible greens – you won’t get another carrot).  

If you’d like to save tomato seeds to plant, first remember that tomatoes from the grocery are hybrids, unless you get heirlooms. Hybrids  mean the plant and tomato you get may not be what you expect (but it will be a tomato!). Scoop the seeds from a cut tomato and save with the liquid surrounding them, or mash a whole tomato and let it set at room temperature two or three days, then rinse gently and dry for storage, or plant them right away.  

Peppers, cucumbers, squash, pumpkin, and eggplant should be allowed to mature before using the seed, as the seed matures along with the vegetable. Planting these can be an adventure, as it’s not possible to know with what or if they’ve been cross pollinated, but try it anyway.  

Garlic will grow happily in a container on your windowsill or in the ground. Buy fresh garlic and use the largest cloves to plant. Put the unpeeled clove, pointed side up, in light soil with the tip just showing. Keep the soil damp and in a few days you should see a green shoot. You can eat this top, but if you let it grow, it will eventually turn brown and dry up. That means the garlic is “done” – you can dig it up and you should have a whole bulb of garlic, from which you can choose the largest clove and start the process again. If you plant garlic outside, you can leave it over winter for a spring harvest, or plant in the spring for a late summer or early autumn harvest.  

Root Crops from the Produce Department

Did you ever sort through one of those tubs of “onion sets” looking for ones that looked alive? Then you know what a bonus buying onions that are already growing can be! Green onions, the kind packaged or rubber banded and ready to eat, can be put back in the ground and grown to full size onions. Look for onions that have a round bulb because flat or thin bulbs may be another type of onion that never grows any larger, like a winter or spring onion. Set the onions upright in two or three inches of water for a couple of hours before planting, then keep the soil damp until the roots have been reestablished. 

  Most full sized onions will regrow if you cut the root end off along with an inch or so of onion. Plant the root in good ground, and keep it watered. It will begin to sprout within a few days and you’ll have green onion shoots, and sometimes a new onion bulb.  

About the only difference between “seed potatoes” and the eating kind of potatoes from the grocery store is the size – government specifications are between 1 ½ and 3 ¼ inches diameter. Other than that, the rules are that they can’t be affected by nematode injury, freezing or various rots, soil or other damages… I truly hope that the potatoes we buy to eat are of such high quality.  

Some potatoes are treated to keep them from sprouting – you’ll want the ones that sprout. Look out for the radiation symbol on the package. Irradiated potatoes are dead – they won’t grow.  

Most sprouting potatoes can be cut to get more than one plant. Just be sure to keep enough of the potato flesh to nurture the sprout until it can develop roots. Plant potatoes when the weather is still cool, barely below ground in light, sandy or straw filled soil.  

  Is it cost effective to buy groceries to garden with? Well, you’ll usually get enough seed from one squash to plant 15 to 20 hills. One potato is enough for three to four plants each of which should produce at least a meal’s worth in a poor season. And remember the “seed quality” beans? How much does it cost for a whole pound of beans?  Buy local – farmers market, roadside stands – for seeds adapted to our area.  Buy organic for untreated seeds!  Once you grow your own, harvest the seed of your best plants, specifically adapted to your very own garden! 

Creative Home & Garden ideas says ‘If you buy some foods, such as horseradish, with the tops (or at least part of the top still attached), you can cut off the top, plant it in the ground, and it will reproduce another horseradish root just like the one you bought. The next year it will divide, and soon from only one top you will have an entire patch of horseradish.

And that’s a bargain. When was the last time you bought something, ate it, and still had 200 of them left over?

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