Whether lazy leftovers for breakfast, a lunch bowl or salad, main course or side dish, winter meals are super nutritious, and definitely not boring! Choose some special keepers from this list!

This is Italian heirloom Corona beans or butter beans/Lima and Brassicas – Broccoli & Brussels Sprouts. plantzst.com

Italian heirloom recipe! Corona beans or butter beans/lima and Brassicas. Yum!

Choose a Szechuan Sauce with some heat and lots of brassicas!! Broccoli, Bok Choy, the works!
From Tiengarden 170 Allen st #1, New York, NY getskinnygovegan

Recipe! Szechuan Sauce and lots of tasty nutritious Brassicas - Broccoli, Cabbage!

Carrots are luscious shred in traditional salads with a bit of pineapple if you are adventurous. Or, roasted, in winter soups and stews, whole or chopped! Try roasted whole slender carrots, drizzled with green tahini sauce, sprinkled with pomegranate seeds! Presented at greatist.com

The Tiny Farm blog says: Sprint, a new Amsterdam forcing variety (good for growing in challenging conditions) that matures long and slender in a listed 42 days. That’s fast, over two weeks ahead of the quickest regular carrot we grow (the fabulous Nelson).

Colorful and dramatic Recipe! Roasted whole Carrots, Green Tahini Sauce, Pomegranate Seeds!

Simple. Hearty brown basmati rice, speckled with onions, petit peas, and dill; this brown rice pilaf is a simple and tasty dish that can be whipped up as a nutritious and hearty weeknight side. At momtastic.com

Recipe for brown Basmati rice, Onions, Petit Peas and Dill

Kale is the Queen of Greens! After you wash the leaves of kale, mustard, turnip, or collard greens, tear out the thick center stalk and tough midribs and cut the leaves into smaller, bite-size pieces. Slightly steam or saute. See the whole delicious recipe and others by Karen Ahn!

Recipe for super Nutrition! Slightly steamed Kale, Mustard, Turnip or Collard greens!
Image by Ultimate Kitchen Commando

Please vary these recipes to your heart’s content! Omit what you don’t currently have in your garden, add, replace an ingredient with what you do have or that you love more! In summer make variations to be eaten cold!

Bon Appétit, Dear Gardeners!

Back to Top

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for our SoCal Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Fig Leaf Squash, Chilacayote ~ Cucurbita ficifolia, a Mexican cuisine favorite!

May I introduce Chilacayote?! cheel-a-ka-YO-teh  At Santa Barbara’s Rancheria Community Garden an extensive vine runs along a fence, up and over an almost 10′ tall Bougainvillea! It prefers climbing! Our Chilacayote is prolific with huge squash 10 to 15 lbs hanging from it; amazing what weight that vine can hold without breaking!

Though it has various names, it is called Chilacayote in Mexico. Though it is called Malabar Gourd, Fig gourd – fig shaped leaves, it is actually a hard edible-skinned summer squash. You can eat the fruit small, around 4 inches in diameter, like a summer squash. Latina gardener Vickie says she cuts bigger fruit into strips, simmers them with cinnamon stick and a syrup of piloncillo, aka panela, and spices like canela, anise and cloves. Or make it into a sweet beverage! Cutting a mature squash offers a challenge just like hard winter squash. More better to harvest the younger ones! The flowers, prolific and fast growing leaves and tender shoots are used in Mexico and other countries as greens.

Or, because the squash is still fresh and delicious when there are few other fruits in the garden, it makes a wonderful base for a winter or early spring smoothie. The flesh is like a firm melon. Scoop out of the rind and remove the seeds. Mix the Chilacayote flesh with ice, sugar to taste and the juice of whatever citrus may be growing in the garden or available, such as lemons or grapefruit. Pineapple is also delicious. Put the raw ingredients in a blender and enjoy! Recipe by Anastasia Sinclair, Waldorf School

Preparing Fig Leaf Squash, Chilacayote ~ Cucurbita ficifolia smoothies! Waldorf School

The many dark flat seeds, similar to, but larger than that of a watermelon, are rich in healthy oils, the most nutritious part of the plant. They can be dry roasted and eaten plain. Toss the seeds in some olive oil and salt and roast them in the oven at 300F. No need to wash them after taking them out of the melon. Enhances the flavor even more. Or make into palanquetas: just pour caramelized sugar over the seeds and let cool into a brittle candy!

YOU NEED PLENTY OF ROOM! 18′ to 50′ vines, even up into neighboring trees, are to be expected! They’re very easy to grow. Direct sow in the ground after the last frost, April/May or per your climate, best when soil temps are 60+. They love lots of water, which is more easily retained if they’re heavily mulched with organic matter, and a thick material like cardboard or old carpet on top of that keeps the weeds down through the whole season. Frost will not harm the fruits. Their skin is especially hard, and it may be necessary to tackle them with a hacksaw, or break them open with an axe! The squash for eating store very well for more than a year without loss in quality. Fruits kept several years dessicate and the seeds rattle around inside – hence the name gourd!

Not to worry if you don’t get fruit right away, they are late producers! The vine grows fast and is said to be a good rootstock for other cucurbits (graft and make a giant pumpkin???). A gardener in N. California says his vine ran rampant all year and flowered frequently but didn’t set more than 2-3 fruit all year until September. Then there were at least a dozen growing quickly! In warmer climes one plant can produce over 50 fruit!

The most north a gardener reported growing it successfully was in Scotland! In SoCal it can be grown like a perennial! The seeds are pricey, but you will only need to buy them once! After that you can save your own to plant again! You won’t need many, so plan to eat the rest!

Back to Top

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for our SoCal Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Rancheria Community Garden Santa Barbara CA Bird, Scaly-breasted Munia, Spice Finch - Lonchura punctulata

I didn’t have my camera with me, but here are the finches I saw!

Male Scaly-breasted munia or spotted munia (Lonchura punctulata), known in the pet trade as nutmeg mannikin or spice finch. This pair is feeding on grains.

If you have seen these under brush, in the shade, from the top, at a distance, you may have missed the black and white pattern underneath. And females and the children, juveniles, look different, a very plain beigey gray, no black and white. The morning of September 23 I was blessed to see two males hanging out in 9′ corn tops at Rancheria Community Garden. The early morning sun was full on them so I got a rich view of their unusual colors. I was charmed!

Birds are one reason we let some plants seed out. In later fall, they need the food when we need the seeds for next year’s planting!

Per Wiki, this munia eats mainly grass seeds [keeping our weeding down] apart from berries and small insects [less pests!]. They forage in flocks and communicate with soft calls and whistles. The species is highly social and may sometimes roost with other species of munias and other birds as well. This species is found in tropical plains and grasslands. Breeding pairs construct dome-shaped nests using grass or bamboo leaves.

Hmm…in many areas it is regarded as an agricultural pest, feeding in large flocks on cultivated cereals such as rice. In Southeast Asia, the scaly-breasted munia is trapped in large numbers for Buddhist ceremonies, but most birds are later released.

Though common, maybe you too have never seen these before. Keep a lookout for our feathered friends. They are often responsible for, uh, prefertilized volunteer seeds! Volunteers can be a spice of life – a delicious surprise brought by Mother Nature, a learning experience, great fun!

If you are wondering if you can expect to see these sweet little birds, per David Bell, ‘In California Scaly-breasted Munias are locally common in San Diego, Ventura, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties especially in riparian habitat. They also occur locally in the south San Francisco bay area and a few other scattered locations. They are common in the Houston, TX area. They also occur in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, although they are generally less common there.’

Take your time when you see small birds around. Focus a wee bit more. Look for some details! Good luck, they are little beauties!

In Santa Barbara, if you find a sick or injured bird contact Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network: Office: (805) 681-1019        Email: contact@sbwcn.org     Helpline: (805) 681-1080      Bless you.

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for our SoCal Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

Lettuce Mizuna Leaves
Elegant Mizuna! See Jill Ettinger’s article at Organic Authority for great info on 15 Bitter Herbs and why we should eat them!

Congratulations on your Pumpkin harvests and Happy Halloween!

Fall/Winter is SoCal Brassica time! Most of the time when we think of Brassicas we think of the big ones – Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbages, Cauliflower, Kale. These are the backbone of your winter garden! But there are lots of littles too! For a more mild taste, plant bok choy, kohlrabi, arugula, mizuna, watercress, young turnips and radishes, and Napa cabbage. Otherwise, go for those dark green kales, mustard, rutabaga and turnip greens!

Plant longer maturing larger and taller varieties to the back, shorter early day varieties in front where they will get sun. Put littles on the sunny side of these. Plant your tall plants first, let them get up a bit. Then clip off the lower leaves and plant your littles. Or plant quick rounds of littles between the tall plants. They will be ready to harvest when the big plants would start shading them. A classic combo is lettuces among starting cabbages!

Mixes rule! Plant several varieties for maturity at different times and to confuse pests. Pests are attracted at certain stages of maturity. They may bother one plant but leave others entirely alone depending on temps and the pest’s cycle! There are less aphids on broccoli when you plant different varieties together. See Super SoCal Fall Veggies Varieties, Smart Companion Plantings!

Lettuce Salanova Dense, Loves Fall & WinterLettuces love cooler fall and winter to spring temps!
Heading types and tender butter leafs! There are all shapes and colors! Try super dense Salanova! (Image at left) Johnny’s says: Harvested as fully mature heads, the flavor and texture have more time to develop than traditional baby-leaf lettuces. The unique structure of the core produces a multitude of uniformly sized leaves, harvestable with one simple cut. Salanova is more than 40% higher yielding, has better flavor and texture, and double the shelf life of traditional baby-leaf lettuce, making it an excellent, more economical option. [Currently the seeds are pricey, but save some for free and you are in biz plus saving your best adapts the seeds to you and your locality! Later on, the prices will likely come down….]

Peas are the trellis plant of your winter garden! Or, plant bush peas in cages for quick peas; get an early variety and you will have them even sooner! Pole peas grow taller and longer, for a couple of months harvest. They usually don’t live the whole season, so it’s common to plant more than one round, once a month is good. Oh, and plant seeds, plus transplants of bush and pole all at the same time for them to come in one after the other. Your bush peas will produce first, then your pole peas, and likely your seeded peas will follow in short order. Soon as those bush peas are done, clip off the plant, leaving the roots with their Nitrogen nodules in the ground to feed your soil. Plant again, either from seeds or transplants, depending on when you think you will be wanting more! Generally transplants are six weeks ahead of seeds.

Golden Sweet Pea! Shelling or eat the young pod whole!Peas are shelling, snap or flat! Shelling means you eat the pea itself. Grow petites or fats. Yum. Snap is shell and all. Rarely do they make it to the kitchen. Flat is the same as Chinese or snow peas. String ’em or buy the stringless variety, and eat ’em right there, toss a few with your salad, steam or stew, add to stir fry! Try some Golden Sweet shelling peas this year! They can also be eaten young like flat peas! Love those mauve-purple blooms! Carrots enhance peas! Plant carrots around the cage or along the trellis.

PreSprouting peas is super simple. Paper towel on plate, lay out peas an inch apart, fold the paper towel, spritz with clean water, keep them moist. By +/- 5 days they will have sprouted. Get them into the ground, carefully so you don’t break the little roots.

Peas are winter’s legume. They and green manure mixes – legumes and oats, feed and replenish your soil because they take N (Nitrogen) out of the air and deposit it in little nodules on their roots! If an area in your garden needs a pep up, plant it to green manure. Plant it where next summer’s heavy feeders, like tomatoes, will be grown!

Winter sports great root crops! Parsnips are related to carrots and both love cool temps! Carrots come in a multitude of shapes, sizes and colors! Kids love them. They do take awhile, so plant some Thumbelinas or Little Fingers for an earlier harvest! Pop in some Cherry Belle radish and a few long winter radishes like Daikon and White Icicle! Winter is a great time for long Cylindra Beets! Put in some early and smaller varieties to eat while you are waiting for the Cylindras. Early Wonder Tall Tops are a tasty choice, or red cold hardy Flat of Egypt! Try a yellow, Touchstone Gold!

Yummy potatoes! Put in some Red Rose, Yukon Gold, Purple Majesty or your favorites. Try some heirloom French Fingerling potatoes! They have pink skins and yellow flesh with usually a little pinkish ring right under the skin. It is a great potato for roasting. Or Red Thumb Fingerlings with a bright red skin and pink flesh. Best boiled or roasted. A favorite among chefs.

Chard comes in marvelous bright colors, the flower of veggie plants! Celery is upright and elegant, an in-the-garden edible let alone low calorie! Later on, lovely cilantro, celery and a carrot or two can be let to grow out for their dainty flowers, then seeds.

Strawberry runner daughters can be clipped Oct 10 to 15, stored in the fridge for planting Nov 5ish. Remove any diseased soil where your beds will be; prep your beds with acidic compost like an Azalea mix. Commercial growers replace their plants every year. Some gardeners let them have two years but production tapers off a lot the second year. If you let them have two years, generously replenish the soil between the berries with acidic compost. Last year I laid down boards between the rows where my berries would be planted. The boards kept the soil moist underneath. I planted the berries just far enough apart that they self mulched (shaded the soil). Worked beautifully. I got the idea for the boards from a pallet gardener.

OR. Check with your favorite nurseries to see when and what kinds of bareroot strawberries they will bring in this year. My local choice is Seascape, bred at UCSB for our specific climate. They are strawberry spot fungi resistant. They have long drought tolerant roots, up to 8″, so they can seek food and water deeper down, less water required. They need only an inch a week, a little more if your finger test shows they need it, or during hotter or windy drying weather. Some nurseries get other varieties of bareroots in Nov, some get Seascapes in mid January. They go fast, so make your calls so you can be there ASAP after they get them.

Plant in super soil to get a good start! Clean up old piles of stuff, remove old mulches that can harbor overwintering pest eggs and diseases. Then add the best-you-can-get composts, manures, worm castings. In planting holes, toss in a handful of nonfat powdered milk in for immediate uptake as a natural germicide and to boost their immune system. Throw in a handful of bone meal for uptake at bloom time. If you have other treats you like to favor your plants with, give them some of that too! Go lightly on incorporating coffee grounds either in your compost or soil. In studies, what was found to work well was coffee grounds at only 0.5 percent of the compost mix. That’s only 1/2 a percent! See more details about soil building! If you have containers, dump that old spent stuff and put in some tasty new mix!

“Our most important job as vegetable gardeners is to feed and sustain soil life, often called the soil food web, beginning with the microbes. If we do this, our plants will thrive, we’ll grow nutritious, healthy food, and our soil conditions will get better each year. This is what is meant by the adage ‘Feed the soil not the plants.
― Jane Shellenberger, Organic Gardener’s Companion: Growing Vegetables in the West (Colorado)

Winter watering in drought times is the same as for summer. Before 10:30 AM, after 4 PM. Watch which way water flows along the leaves. Some plants it flows to the center stem. Some drip water off the leaf tips in a circle around your plant, the dripline. Still others go both ways. Make berms just beyond where the mature plant’s water flows. If at the dripline, that’s where the tiny feeder roots take up moisture and nutrients. That’s why they call them feeder roots! If your garden has a low spot, plant your water loving plants – chard, lettuces, spinach, mizuna, mints – there or near a spigot.

Fall pests & Diseases

  • Brassicas, Peas  – Mildews, White Fly, Aphids/Ants. Right away when you have the 3rd, 4th leaves on seedlings or when you plant transplants, give your plants a bath. It’s a combo of disease prevention, boosting the immune system, and stimulating growth! The basic mix is 1 regular Aspirin, 1/4 c nonfat powdered milk, heaping tablespoon Baking Soda, and a teaspoon of dish soap. Even old tired plants will perk right up!If Whiteflies and aphids/ants come along, give them a bath too! Get a good grip on your hose and wash them away when you first see them. Be sure to get hideaways under the leaves and in crevices!
  • Chard, Lettuces, Spinach – Slugs and snails are the bane of so many crops, but these especially. Lay down something like Sluggo immediately. Then do it again in a week or so. Kill the parents, kill the children. After about 3 times you rarely need it again anytime soon.
  • Biodiversity In general, avoid row planting where disease and pests wipe the plants out from one to the next to the next. Instead, plant in several different spots. If you can’t help yourself, because your family always planted in rows or that’s the way farm pictures show plantings, remember, this is YOUR garden! Also, leave room so mature plants’ leaves don’t touch. Give them room to breathe, get good big leaves that get plenty of sun and produce lots more big leaves and many big fruits! Stunted crowded rootbound plants just don’t perform as well and are more disease and pest susceptible.

Keep up with your maintenance. Weed so seedlings aren’t shaded out. Thin carrots, beets, cilantro, arugula, onions, any plants you overplanted, for salad treats! If you decide your plants need it give them a light sidedress of liquid feed, fish emulsion (if you don’t have predators) or a tasty tea mix – compost, worm castings, manure. Give your berms a check. Restore or add, shift as needed. Before wind or rain, double check cages and trellises, top heavy plants. Stake them, tie peas to the trellis or cage. Start gathering sheets, light blankets for possible cold weather to come.

Have it in the back of your mind what summer plants you will be wanting, where you will plant them. Plant more permanent plants like a broccoli you keep for side shoots (All Season F1 Hybrid), a kale that will keep on going, where they will not be shaded out by taller indeterminate summer tomatoes.

Already be thinking of Santa Barbara’s January 29 Seed Swap! Start sorting and labeling seed baggies on coming cooler indoor evenings. The last Saturday of January every year is National Seed Swap Day! This year that happens to also be Chinese New Year of the Rooster, January 28! Look in your area for an event, and if you don’t find one, collaborate with your local garden club or permaculture group to get one going!

California Seed Sharing Bill Signed into Law
September 14, 2016

Seed sharing in California took a major step forward on Friday when Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the California Seed Exchange Democracy Act, an amendment to the California Seed Law. It’s the latest victory in a global movement to support and protect seed sharing and saving.

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic!

Back to Top

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

See the entire October 2016 GBC Newsletter!

October is a Fine Fall Planting Month!
Recipes! Get Ready to Eat Tasty Warm Winter Meals!
Fig Leaf Squash, Chilacayote – Curcurbita ficifolia
Community Garden Birds! 
Other Community Gardens – Clinton Community Garden, Manhattan NY 

Events! Permaculture talk & Book Signing with Starhawk, Lane Farms Pumpkin Patch! Happy Halloween! January 29 Santa Barbara SEED SWAP!

See the wonderful September images at Rancheria Community Garden!


Design Veggie Garden Plan Trees
This garden project is a small first step toward more forest gardening and “food forests” in Portland Maine. It is nested within a broader initiative called “Edible East Bayside” which seeks to increase edible landscaping, vegetable gardens, fruit and nut tree planting, rooftop growing, food-related business and access to healthy food for all in the East Bayside Neighborhood.

Choose a great spot for your veggie garden! Ideally it would have nutritious soil and 6 to 8 hours of golden sun! If you are on a slope, consider some wise water moving terracing. Slow, Spread, Sink. If you only have a marsh area, maybe raised beds at the edges and pallet walkways are the answer.

Water flow. Look at the lay of your land for highs and lows. You could leave those natural areas and capitalize on them for bioswales, rain water collection and purification with native grasses. Plant perennial herbs with deep roots in the higher dryer areas. Mingle them with some shapely and beautiful rocks and a chair or two so you can sit and enjoy the scents. Channel water to moisture loving plants like lettuces, arugula, bok choy, bunch onions, celery, chard and spinach in lower areas. Give colorful chard a space where it lights up your garden like a flower!

Greywater or your water source location may define where your garden can be well placed to save water in drought times and lower your water bills. Get your gutters up, and some knowledgeable assistance to decide how and where your water will be directed.

Wind and dryness can easily be tempered with well placed wind permeable shrub lines. Blueberries are tasty! Instead of blow away mulch, you use gravel. Waffle gardens are an age old way of gardening in hot and very dry areas. Mulch in the basin, wind flows over the tops of the basin berms.

How much space do you have? Enough land lets you raise veggies in succession – start crops once a month for a continuous table supply for your family, and allow you to rotate and rest areas. Small spaces profit from going Vertical! That means trellises, cages, fences for vining plants like peas, and in the summer tomatoes, squash, melon and beans! Understory companion plants carefully placed increase your harvest by almost double! If your space is really limited, but you want a variety, plant dwarf and container varieties. Use vertical stack and tiered planters with hanging pots above! Clamp boxes to balcony fence rails, hang containers on fences!

Plant Tall to the north, shorties like strawberries to the south! Plants that take longer to mature often take up a bigger footprint and get taller. Place them north of the others, like when you plant mixed varieties of Broccoli to ward off aphids. Shade from the West means you plant tall in the East and vice versa.

Incorporate a greenhouse into your plans if you have space. It can be small or big, dug into the slope, with or without electricity, or fine and fancy! In colder areas you can start plants much earlier, grow some plants much longer in fall, overwinter others!

Locate the composter or compost pile, and a worm box if you will be having them. Neither needs shade; that’s where your storage shed can go. Compost and worms process faster in the sun and are less likely to be forgotten! If you don’t have space, simply buy great compost and think about having a worm system in your kitchen to eat your kitchen scraps! Comfrey, yarrow and chamomile are compost speeder uppers. Great to plant comfrey, a most nutritious nutrient accumulator, near the composter and comfrey by a water spigot. Comfrey loves water, and compost needs to be moist to decompose. Perfect threesome!

Borage is a perfect winter flower for bees since their favorite color is blue. Yellow is next. Plant other bee plants too! If you are willing, have a bee keeper come and install a bee hive, or learn how and do it yourself! Make a home for native bees too! Honey bees need a sunny place. Consult with your beekeeper for the right safe placement for you, guests and your bees.

Bees are day flyers, bats and owls are night flyers. Owls are amazing and super rodent catchers! Owl houses have specific requirements. Inquire with local experts to see if your location meets their needs. Bats are terrific insect eaters, approximately 1200 per night!

Mono-cultures, Poly-cultures and Companion Plants If your family were row planters maybe you will be too, but you don’t have to! Mixing it up, planting anything anywhere is the extreme opposite, but you get the idea. Plant a couple brocs here, another two or three somewhere else, and so on. Keep pests and disease from spreading right down that monoculture row. Biodiversity really works and is the magic of our planet!

Companion planting adds its special effects to Poly-cultures! It makes sense and is easy to do. It can be a spatial thing, like carrots go down, peas go up. Or it can be that carrots enhance peas and the peas are more prolific. Cilantro enhances broccoli and Brassicas. Plant fast growers between slow growers, like lettuce that repels cabbage moths between slow growing cabbages. Onion, chives and beets are wonderful fillers, just no alliums (onion types) near peas! Research has shown there are less aphids when you plant different varieties of brocs together!

The ultimate Poly-culture and ideal garden per land use is an edible Forest garden/Food forest! Every square inch is productive! Start with trees, then shrubs, veggies as detailed in the image. There are guilds of compatible (companion) plants starting with the permanent residents, the trees, as your key plant. This is not your formal English garden, but there is no reason why you can’t have a few beds or rows here and there. Gardens grow best when you are happy! Check out the trees already on your property or closely neighboring. Decide which will be the anchor to your garden. Work with it. Sit there, sleep there, feel it. Talk with other Forest gardeners. It will take some time, but there are clever ways to get there.

Food Forest - Forest Garden 7 Level Design

For many, sustainability is the key word. Every veggie garden is meant to feed us, but how well does it do it for you? Yes, we are not using plastic or food miles and have super garden to table nutrition. Another question, would it feed you in emergency conditions? Nuts are protein. Do you have seeds stored in your emergency kit? Start where you can. I don’t own property, but I do garden at a Community Garden and you better believe I save seeds!

For others, their garden is a place of serenity, taking a break from all the rest, no talking. We get to hear the birds, get outdoors, and at community gardens exchange ideas and make new friends. A garden is a special place. Your design tells your story. We laugh about how dogs and their owners often look alike, well so does your garden look like you. It may be a gleefully tumultuous jungle or a right proper place. Happy to meet you!

Food Forest - Forest Garden Home

This edible food forest mixes styles and principles. Likely yours will too!

Back to top

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal. During late spring/summer we are in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

See the entire September 2016 GBC Newsletter!

September Starts SoCal’s Second Season!
Designing Your SoCal Winter Veggie Garden! Think Big!
Two Mexican Herbs Used Instead of Cilantro!
Other Community Gardens – Cultiva Ciudad-helmed Huerto Tlatelolco, Mexico City 

Events! National Heirloom Exposition in Santa Rosa CA, 6th Annual Fermentation Festival, Master Gardeners’ Year-Round Edibles from the Garden – Fall Planting!

…and wonderful August images at Rancheria Community Garden!

Gorgeous Kale - Purple Curly Leaf
There’s kale and there’s kale! This truly tasty purple curly leaf kale image is by Steve!

Last Harvests are being collected and stored! Some of you have started seedling nurseries or starts at home, many have prepped their soil and harvested seeds! If you didn’t yet, make your fall planting beds extra yummy – add 5-10% compost, 25% worm castings, manures – the amount depending on the type of manure. We want rich soil for those big winter plants. Seeds do especially better with worm castings! We want lots of those marvelous leaves for greens. Winter plants like brocs, collards, cauliflower, chard, are heavy producers, need plenty of food.

BUT NOT CARROTS! Too good a soil makes them hairy and they fork.  And over watering, irregular watering, can make them split. Build your beds up so they drain well, are above the coldest air that settles low down. PEAS, the winter legume, make their own Nitrogen, so feed only lightly if at all

Some of you carry your layout plan in your head, others draw and redraw, moving things around until it settles and feels right. Do add a couple new things just for fun! Try another direction. Add some herbs or different edible flowers. Stand back, take a deep breath and ask yourself why you plant the way you do. Anything been tickling the back of your mind you are curious about?

If you need to skip a beat, take some time off from the garden, let it rest, but let nature rebuild while it’s resting!

  1. You can cover it deeply with all the mulch materials you can lay your hands on up to 18′ deep. Believe me, it will settle quickly. Let the herds of soil organisms do their work over winter. That’s called sheet composting or composting in place – no turning or having to move it when it’s finished. If you are vermicomposting, have worms, add a few handfuls to speed up and enrich the process. Next spring you will have rich nutritious living layers of whole soil soil for no work at all!
  2. You can plant it with green manure. Laying on lots of mulch is a ton of work when you do it, just gathering the materials can be a challenge. Green manure takes some work too, but it has awesome results as well. You broadcast a seed mix of legumes and oats and let them grow. Bell beans, Austrian peas, vetch and oats from Island Seed & Feed Goleta is an excellent choice. Legumes gather Nitrogen from the air and store it in nodules on their roots! N is the main ingredient your plants need for their growth! The oat roots break up the soil. They dig deep and open channels for water and air.

Kale Flat Leaf High Mowing.jpgIf you decide to plant, unless you have Bagrada Bugs, it’s Brassica time! They are the mainstay of winter gardens! Their leaves are edible – Kales the Queens! Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, Cauliflower and collard greens! Then there are all the mini Bs, the fillers and littles – arugula, bok choy, mizuna, kohlrabi, mustards, radish, turnips. Rather than plant six pack transplants, put in seed when possible and stagger your plantings of the large Brassicas. Rather than all six cauliflower coming in at once, plant two now, two later and so on. Adjust that, of course, if you have a large area available to plant and a lot of people to feed! Another way to do it is to get varieties with early, middle and late maturity dates and plant them all at once! Plant both mini and monster cabbages at the same time! Minis come in sooner, monsters later!

Finicky eaters may enjoy a marvelous selection! Fall veggies come in lots of shapes and colors! Kales are renowned for their beauty and varieties – classic curly leaf, Red Russian, Elephant, Red Bor, that is really purple, are just a few! Cauliflower comes in traditional shape and spiral, classic white and yellow and purple and green! Get seed packs of them all and mix them together! Carrots already come in color mix seed packets! Circus Circus is a fun choice, especially when your kids are planting! Beets are terrific fun! Yellows, reds, pinks, whites and Chioggias (circles of colors)! You can get them in rainbow mixes just like getting rainbow chard mixes! Rather than have your finicky eater say no, open up that catalog or take them shopping a the nursery and let them pick what they would like to try!

More veggies that love cooler weather are beets, carrots, celery, chard, cilantro, leeks, spinach and especially lettuce – tender butter leafs and heading lettuce! If you anticipate a hot Sep, plant more heat tolerant lettuce.

  • The winter legume is PEAS! Peas are like beans, they come in bush and pole types. And those come in three main types – shelling, eating snap peas and flat China/snow peas! They are super easy to sprout! Dampen the paper towel; spray the towel to keep it moist. Takes 2 to 4 days. Pop them into the garden by the trellis – if it is hot, devise some shade for them. You just need to be careful as you plant them so you don’t break the sprout off. Definitely plant some every month or so. They don’t live all season long. When they are done, they’re done. It is true that picking peas, just like picking beans, is labor intensive. I eat a lot of mine before they get home, so I don’t mind. Bush peas come in first and pretty much all at once; pole come on later and continue to produce. On the first round it makes sense to plant both at once!
  • Onions For the biggest, sweetest harvests, late summer and early fall are the prime times to sow seeds of short- or intermediate-day onions. Fall-sown short- and intermediate-day onions tend to yield more and are larger and sweeter than those seeded or transplanted in early spring.

Image result for long beets cylindraVarieties that do better in winter are long beets like Cylindras, long radishes like Daikons, pretty China Rose and handsome Long Black Spanish! Plant small beets like Dutch Baby Ball for quick beets while your Cylindras are growing twice to three times bigger!

Combos make a difference! Carrots enhance peas, onions stunt peas. Plant the carrots on the sunny side feet of pole beans. Combos can use space wisely! Carrots grow down, peas grow up, perfect! Cabbage babies need to be planted 12 to 28″ apart! A healthy plant will take up much closer to that 28″. They take a long while to grow, head, head tight! Plant lettuces that repel cabbage moths, or other fillers, that mature sooner, in the space between them. You can do this at home amongst your ornamentals, and/or in containers too! Fillers can be onion/chive types, beets. Short quickest growing winter radishes can be among the long slower growing carrots among the slowest growing, your cabbages. Cilantro makes brocs grow REALLY well, bigger, fuller, greener! Research has shown there are less aphids when you plant different varieties of brocs together!

No need to plant patches or rows, unless you want to. Scatter them about on the sunny side between larger plants as an understory! Plant different varieties to keep your table exciting. Don’t plant them all at once, but rather every week or two for steady table supply. If you would enjoy a quick payback on your table, select the earliest maturing varieties.

If you have lots of seeds, overplanting is an age old practice. Plant too, too many, then thin them with tiny pointy scissors, aka harvest the young, and eat ’em! Young radish sprouts, teeny carrots, little Brassicas of all kinds are wonderful in a salad! If they get a little big, steam them or add to stir fries and stews. Another way to do it is plant flats of lettuces, mesclun mixes, and mow them! Tender baby greens! They will grow back 3, 4 times.

When planting in hot fall weather, plant your outdoor seeds a tad deeper than you would in spring; soil is moister and cooler an extra inch or two down. It’s the law to keep them moist. If you plant successively for steady fresh table supply, plant a batch in September, again in October. Days will shorten and start cooling, but you are taking advantage of a fast start because your plants will grow quickly in the warmer weather now than later on. Sep plant from seeds, Oct from transplants.

Winter Feeding Lettuces like a light feed of chicken manure cultivated in. All the winter plants are heavy producers – lots of leaves, some of those leaves are monsters! Cabbages are packed tight, leaf after leaf! They may need a light feed. Remember, it’s cooler now, so their uptake is slower, so give them liquid feeds, teas, things easy for them to uptake.

Keep letting your strawberry runners grow for Oct harvest. Plant in October or plant new bareroot plants. If you replace your strawberries, in Santa Barbara try Seascape, bred at UCSB. Big plentiful berries, firm, tasty, strawberry spot resistant! They have long roots that gather plenty of nutrition and stay moist at deeper levels. Remember, strawberries like slightly acidic soil, so get Azalea/Camellia compost for their bed.

Pest and Disease Prevention  Drench young plants, ones you just transplanted, with Aspirin solution to get them off to a great start! Drench your seedlings when they get up a few inches. One regular Aspirin, 1/4 C nonfat powdered milk, 1/2 teaspoon liquid dish soap (surfactant), per gallon of water. Aspirin, triggers a defense response and stimulates growth! Powdered milk is a natural germicide and boosts the immune system. Be sure to get under the leaves too!

Brassica pests! Lots of ants and lengthwise curling leaves are the giveaways for aphids. Aphids carry viruses. Aphids come in fat gray or small black. Avoid over watering that makes for soft plants, tender leaves that aphids thrive on, and ant habitat. Spray the aphids away, make the ants leave. Get up under those leaves, and fervently but carefully do the tender growth tips. Do it consistently until they don’t come back.

September is still Seed Saving time for some. Make notes on how your plants did, which varieties were the most successful. These seeds are adapted to you and your locality. Each year keep your best! Store your keepers in a cool dry place for next year’s plantings. Generously gather seeds for upcoming January Seed Swap!

Borage is a magical cool season plant with edible flowers, blue for bees! It has a large 3 to 4′ footprint, so allow for that or plan to keep clipping it back. Plant Sweet Peas for Christmas bloom!

Plant gift plants or bowls or baskets for the holidays! Fall bounty is on its way!

Love your Mother! Plant bird & bee food! Think grey water! Grow organic!

Back to Top

The Green Bean Connection started as correspondence for the Santa Barbara CA USA, Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden. All three of Santa Barbara city community gardens are very coastal, during late spring/summer in a fog belt/marine layer area most years, locally referred to as the May grays, June glooms and August fogusts. Keep that in mind compared to the microclimate niche where your veggie garden is. Bless you for being such a wonderful Earth Steward!

See the entire September 2016 GBC Newsletter!

September Starts SoCal’s Second Season!
Designing Your SoCal Winter Veggie Garden! Think Big!
Two Mexican Herbs Used Instead of Cilantro!
Other Community Gardens – Cultiva Ciudad-helmed Huerto Tlatelolco, Mexico City 

Events! National Heirloom Exposition in Santa Rosa CA, 6th Annual Fermentation Festival, Master Gardeners’ Year-Round Edibles from the Garden – Fall Planting!

…and wonderful August images at Rancheria Community Garden!


I had to laugh when I saw this image and its reference to an ‘unsightly back yard!’ It was in the Washington Times Magazine Section April 29, 1906, listing Facts & Figures on how much you can save by gardening. They spoke of how it ‘enter[s] the mind every spring and summer,’ and, of course, here today in SoCal in the Fall as well when ‘winter’ planting is late August to October! Perfect timing to have come across this at a season change planting time!

You gotta see the before and after images, check out historical thinking and process, how gardening was different then and yet the same as today! See a large readable image here.(5.2MB)

So how about it?! LOL! Do you have an unsightly back yard that could be converted? And how hard would it be to do that?!

1 Cost of your time – Gain of outdoor communion with the sky, the earth, plants and creatures – soil organisms, tiny, furry, scaly, feathered, amazing insects

2 Some sore muscles? Maybe. Overall health improves, for some dramatically! The freshest from garden to table. No plastics, no food miles pollution. Likely some morning dew on your feet….

3 Purchase tools, gloves, soil builders, seeds, transplants. The organic veggies return will more than pay for those in one season. You get to make great new friends at the nursery!

4 Yes, there will be wins and losses, some losses inexplicable. But, oh, the satisfaction! Proud of your harvests, your heart feels happy to share your bounty with friends, loved ones, and if enough, donate.

5 There is some daily care that makes sense. Things grow better that way. A little water, weed pulling, this and that. For many it’s like a quiet time after work, a meditation. But no over watering!

One of the gardeners in the Times article produced so much she and her children sold their extra at market and paid their 1906 taxes on their home with that income!

If the unsightly backyard doesn’t call you, what about that unsightly front yard?!

%d bloggers like this: